Monday, November 28, 2016

Mystery Monday: John Glasgow

It's Monday, which means it's time for:



Every Monday, I'm presenting a new mystery. Some have been solved...some remain unsolved to this day. 

Today's mystery fascinates me because it involves a normal family man. 45-year-old John Glasgow was a respected accountant in the construction industry. He was the top accountant at CDI Construction in Little Rock, Arkansas.


John and his wife, Melinda

CDI was undergoing an audit by one of the company's owners, Dillard's. The audit put so much stress on John, he took a ski trip to Colorado. His brother noticed he seemed uncharacteristically depressed. However, a quick talk seemed to cheer him right up.



He returned home and worked nonstop, trying to catch up on the other work that had fallen behind during the audit. He worked the entire weekend of January 27th and had a great dinner with friends on Sunday evening.



On Monday, January 28, 2008, his wife woke up to find he wasn't in the house. She went to work, assuming he'd simply left the house before her. That afternoon, John's co-worker called to say he hadn't shown up for work that day.



A neighbor said he saw his car pull out of the driveway at 5:15 a.m. That was unusually early for him to go to work.



They found a list of important numbers by the phone, including the combination to their home safe. It had been set out on the counter where it could be easily seen. The handwriting was confirmed to be John's.


Image credit: Investigation Discovery

They traced John's cell phone and found on that date, it traveled from his house to Conway County, Arkansas. Soon after, John's car was found at the top of nearby Petit Jean Mountain, in the parking lot of Mather Lodge. It was unlocked. His laptop, credit cards, and cell phone were in the car.



Mather Lodge

They searched the nearby trails for years and found nothing...until 2015. Police confirmed they'd found bone fragments they had identified as John Glasgow's in a remote part of the nearby mountains. While the remains were only a mile from the car, getting to them involved steep trails and almost insurmountable boulders.




There were no signs of trauma to the skull, nor were bullet fragments found. That doesn't rule out foul play, but it still leaves quite a few questions. Why was John Glasgow in the woods--was he on a simple hike when something happened? He was known to "walk it off" when he was stressed. Or did he meet someone at the lodge who forced him into the woods? Was it suicide or murder? 



What do you think happened to John Glasgow?

38 comments:

  1. Or did e commit suicide? Perhaps the audit was about to expose him.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I believe in the Disappeared episode on Investigation Discovery, they revealed the audit turned out okay. But it could have been suicide for other reasons. They tried to set up that he wasn't depressed and all seemed fine the night before, but there's no way to know what really goes on in someone's head.

      Delete
  2. I would go with the suicide theory. Nobody does that kind of prep work unless they weren't going to come back.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That does seem the most logical conclusion.

      Delete
  3. That is odd and leaves so many questions unanswered. Makes me wonder about the list of numbers and safe combination they found. Where they numbers his wife didn't have and he left for her or numbers he had used before he disappeared? Interesting case.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I got the impression (just my interpretation) that they were numbers he thought she'd need if he never came back.

      Delete
  4. It sounds like the poor guy had big problems. These murder/suicides leave so many unanswerable questions. How do all those television programs solve a case in an hour??

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I know, right? The frustrating thing is that there are SO many unsolved deaths out there.

      Delete
  5. Would like to know if there was anything significant in the safe. That would mean one of two things: he felt his life was in danger and so might have set it up for something to be found, or he knew he would commit suicide and wanted his family to have access to important documents.

    I wonder who he was meeting so early in the morning. The car feels somewhat staged. Why place cell phone and credit cards in the car, unlocked?

    My two cents on a conspiracy theory:

    He and an accomplice were cooking the books and the accomplice got a little antsy and offed Glasgow before he could spill the beans. Accountant + Audit + Missing body = Murder.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You have the mind of a mystery author, for sure!

      Delete
    2. I think it seems obvious that he committed suicide.

      1. He's depressed about his credibility being questioned. Unusual behavior.

      2.Falls asleep in chair and never goes to bed that night. Unusual behavior.

      3.He gets up and leaves numbers on the counter as if he isn't planning on returning. Unusual behavior.

      4. He leaves with the clothes in his back at 5;15am without saying goodbye to his wife, which is unusual behavior.

      5.Drives to the mountain early in the morning. Unusual behavior.

      6.Leaves his work equipment and his credit cards together in his unlocked truck as if he has checked out. Unusual behavior.

      Could those numbers be latitude and longitude of his body location?

      The timing of everything suggest that he committed suicide, and the audit turned out ok only after the man went missing. If this had been sooner then thing's could have turned out differently. Some people just can't handle the thought of getting blaimed for something really bad that they didn't do, especially if it's public. That company was telling Glassglow that it's usually the CEFO's that Usually go to jail for these things which would be him, so I could imagine all of the things running through his mind.

      Delete
    3. Passports and money were in the safe , they kept a certain amount of money in there but the safe combination and bank details were already known to his wife , she herself doesn't know why he wrote them down but confirms it was his handwriting and nothing was missing from the safe or their bank accounts .

      Delete
  6. The phone numbers and safe combo are odd. I like your idea that he was being helpful, just in case...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, it does feel that he either planned something or he feared something would happen...

      Delete
  7. If you leave the combination to the safe, you're doing it with forethought that you're not coming back.

    ReplyDelete
  8. He seemed depressed--could it have been serious, in need of antidepressants? SInce I've been on one myself, I've been curious ot hear other stories of depression.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Definitely could have been. The word "depressed" was used several times in the interviews of his family members and friends, but it was not meant in the clinical way. However, I don't know that people can always tell if someone is clinically depressed by looking at them.

      Delete
  9. Sounds like a suicide, to me, that he didn't want his family to witness.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. True--I wondered if he went to one of the high cliffs and jumped. When I was reading up on where his remains were found, it sounded like that might have been possible.

      Delete
  10. I'm clueless. Have you ever focused on Jennifer Kesse (I hope I spelled her name correctly)? She disappeared in Orlando. Her car was found in a parking lot soon after. The police have ignored blow ups of the photos of the man who left the car. He appears to have been a security guard with a bicycle. I've seen the photos, and they terrify me.

    Love,
    Janie

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I included her in my coverage of Tara Grinstead's disappearance...some have linked the two.

      http://stephie5741.blogspot.com/2016_04_17_archive.html

      Delete
  11. Suicide. It sounds like he might have suffered from (clinical?) depression perhaps brought on by the stress of the audit. Extreme stress and fatigue can alter brain chemistry. If he had never dealt with MDD before and didn't understand the symptoms, he could have thought he would never feel better. If that was the case, it's too bad he didn't seek help. Just a theory...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That sounds like the best explanation so far!!! Poor guy. He should have at least opened up to someone about it first.

      Delete
  12. I'd think suicide until evidence is uncovered to prove otherwise. Still there have been some freak murders when someone just happens upon the wrong person. So sad either way.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I may be wrong, but I doubt they're investigating it now that they've found his remains. I know before they were investigating it as a missing persons case, but I doubt they're devoting much time to it at this point.

      Delete
  13. That is a mystery. Since his personal things were found in his car, it likely is a suicide. Of course, he might have had an accident or run across the wrong person. I'm no good at solving crimes. It's a sad story for his wife though.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It does sound like suicide. The worst thing is that his wife will never really know for sure.

      Delete
  14. There are too many mysteries I wish we could find the answers too. If this were one of the tv series episodes I watch, Diane Carlisle's scenario would fit. But then life isn't always like tv.

    ReplyDelete
  15. It sounds like he planned it, but then again, he might have been lured out. And had a funny feeling about it.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Crazy and a little creepy. I bet his wife blamed herself for not knowing where he went that day. :( I really don't know how she slept through him getting up and leaving. I wake at the slightest noise or movement. I'd totally notice if my husband got up and left in the middle of the night.

    If someone killed him, they did a good job with the evidence. I'm guessing it was probably either suicide or an accident. Everything seems too well planned and laid out.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's because he never went to bed that night. He slept in the living room which was unusual on his part.

      Delete
  17. This is too bad! I think it was suicide!

    ReplyDelete
  18. I don't know about suicide. Don't suicide victims leave notes more often than not? Perhaps he was having an affair and an angry other party discovered him and either tried to blackmail him, or killed him in rage. Pushing him down the steep slope.

    ReplyDelete
  19. I don't believe suicide or foul play. Family and friends said he was a predictable guy and was known to go on hikes to clear his mind during challenging times. Being the predictable, diligent person he was, he left the safe combos and the stuff in his car, just in case of an unlikely accident while hiking a mountain an hour away from home and job, in January winter.

    Perhaps all that stuff was in the car because he was indeed planning to quit his job that day, like his wife surmised. Before doing that, he wanted to clear his mind on the mountain. But I think, being tired and stressed out, he lost his footing and fell down that cliff where they ultimately found his skull and other other items nearby. He didn't die from that or hit his head. Perhaps he sprained a wrist or ankle or broke a leg, ending up stranded, then starving to death in the cold. Horrible way to go, but most likely what happened.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That doesn't explain him leaving his credit cards in the unlocked truck and the numbers on the counter. All of his actions were unusual for his behavior. Yeah, I thought accident for a moment, but I think he committed suicide because he couldn't handle the pressure and the thought of his credibility being questioned or tarnished and possibly going to jail which is what the other company was scaring him into believing. It wasn't until after he went missing that everything came back clear. Who knows for certain though.

      Delete
  20. I agree on the accident theory. I also wonder at how some people or couples can live so distants each other. Very good blog.

    ReplyDelete
  21. I don't think suicide. He was a very well documented type of person. His audit came back to show he done no foul deals... but didn't say if there were anything foul about the situation. Him being this documented. He would have left final words to his wife. He left her numbers and the combination. Stuff she clearly was already aware of... but no good byes? I definitely think it's foul play. Big money is involved. My opinion.

    ReplyDelete