Friday, January 22, 2016

When Bad People Leave Prison

One of the worst things about reading old true crime books is that sometimes you learn that the person you’re reading about has already served his time. That means he’s out on the street. Some of them are murderers and extremely dangerous people, which makes me like this:



Some are just (allegedly) fraudsters. Like Anthony Pignataro.



Anthony is a narcissistic medical doctor who was convicted for killing one patient and not convicted for injuring many others. When his medical license was taken away, he poisoned his wife until she almost died. 



The reason? He said he wanted to show that even the best doctors can’t save some patients. 



Had she died, as planned, his warped ego had him thinking that nobody would detect the arsenic in her body and the world would suddenly see him as a victim, rather than a villain. 



Yeah…that plan didn’t work out so well for him. He served 13 or so years in jail and was let out in December 2013. It didn't make national news that this nutball is now on the streets. 



For 13 years, the government has had to keep attorneys assigned to his case because he's filed six appeals. He was released on parole and continues to appeal. I assume he wants his good name back, since he can't ascend to "greatness" once again while being known as the former doctor who killed one woman on the operating table, injured many more, and then poisoned his wife.



By now the world has forgotten this doctor...and I assume he won't be able to practice medicine in America due to his past. But he could head off to another country and start operating on people there. He may even marry again. Seems former murderers have no trouble finding people who will marry them, as you'll find on any crime show.



Do you know of any murderers who served their time and are now free to roam the country?

60 comments:

  1. Not personally!
    Some learn their lesson in prison, some don't. He'll probably head off somewhere to Europe or South America to practice again.

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    1. Sadly, yes. And the guy is a mess. It sounds like he kinda fudged his medical degree and somehow managed to get a license...then keep practicing even after he was under review for killing a woman during breast implant surgery. His narcissism had him believing he didn't need to conduct surgeries in hospitals with licensed professionals like anesthesiologists and skilled nurses and such...

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    2. I know Anthony Pignataro. Sort of. He did my breast augmentation, dragged me to San Juan, wouldn't let me use the phone to get away... I'm the woman in Ann Rule's book titled, Last Dance Last Chance named Moira-that's not my name. My breasts are atrocious. I do all I can to hide them. I'm currently looking for a surgeon who will be willing to remove them and reconstruct the damage he caused. He's a horrible person!

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    3. So sorry to hear that! I read that story right before I wrote this...it's what prompted me to write something on him, when I learned he's now a free man. I only hope he'll never be able to practice medicine anywhere again. He's a danger to anyone he touches.

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  2. I think that in my country we don't have a life sentence in jail, 40 years is the highest one, and even that is rarely given to anyone. We have cases in which you kill somebody and walk out of jail in three or four years, maybe even less. Life is the cheapest of goods these days

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    1. If there's one thing I've learned while listening to these Ann Rule crime series, it's that in the 70s, 80s, and 90s, it apparently was common for murderers to get 20-year sentences. They didn't seem to have the "life without the possibility of parole" option back then? It was either death or they might be out on the streets someday. That is so sad that life doesn't mean more than three or four years there--very scary. It still scares me how often murderers are never caught here. That shouldn't be the case.

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    2. PS forgot to tell you that I've noticed some people around the blog are trying to copy this humorous writing style of posts of yours with funny, intelligently chosen witty pics or GIFs as illustrations, but they've got nothing on you, they can just keep trying and shaming themselves :)

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    3. Haha, imitation is the sincerest form of flattery! But I actually got this style from some MySpace bloggers back in 2008. A few of them started slipping photos in their posts just as I do. I think they stole it from some websites? I know Buzzfeed does things this way sometimes, but they may not have been around back then. Do you know why I do it this way? Because I spend my day writing 500-word blog posts for clients and this seems like "fun writing."

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    4. Love it, Stephanie! Keep up the good work. Love the pictures in the text!

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    5. This moron is actually my cousin. I hope he never hurts anyone else.

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  3. My cousins wife had him bludgeoned to death in his garage with a baseball bat for his insurance by her boyfriend. She got a life sentence and I was looking up the former news report on it for a book I was writing. I found her dressed in very little in a seductive post asking to correspond with "one good man." I assumed she wanted him to send her money. I thought, "damn!" how many good men are you going screw? I sent a copy of the photo to the State District Attorney who had the photo taken down and policy's changed to keep inmates from advertising their "wares" from prison.

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    1. OMG!!! At least she's in jail for it...is she eligible for parole at some point? It is disturbing to me how often women do that stupid crap for money--and they are always, always caught. I can't believe they're so stupid that they think they'll get away with it...and sadly it's often for hundreds of thousands of dollars. Is that all a life is worth to these people?

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    2. I don't know if she is eligible for parole, she was convicted of Capitol Murder. The whole family hopes she rots in hell. This second cousin and his younger brother were raised by my Aunt and Uncle after their parents and infant brother were killed in a car wreck by a drunk driver. The older brother was a successful engineer, the younger continued living with the Aunt and Uncle and he signed over his ranch to him in exchange for taking care of them in their old age...but died of a heart attack at the age of 28 with no will...so the property went to the older brother by law...and to the murderer after she had him killed. The last time I visited that Uncle at the age of 94, he was still trying to get his property back. His son told me after his death they had to pay the bitch off and set up a hefty trust fund for her kids by her ex-husbands to get it back. A very sad story indeed.

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  4. Ah. That one was in Buffalo. You'd be shocked at the things that happen in Buffalo that don't make national news and should. lol

    There was a serial killer there fro about 20 years (he got arrested finally about 10 years ago) and no one outside Buffalo knew anything about him.

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    1. Crazy! I thought serial killers would always make national news. Lots of cover-up there?

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  5. I try to stay away from those stories, as they just stress me out. I can't imagine how that must feel for the friends and families of the victims.

    Murderer of a friend and former client begins trial today. I'm hoping that bastard never sees daylight again.

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    1. I'm so sorry you're going through that. That has to be tough. I always feel so bad for the families of victims in these cases.

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  6. Not personally, but while many critique the criminal justice system, I prefer one that favors keeping innocent people out of prison than one that convicts 99% of people with little chance of getting out of prison.

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    1. It is so sad that innocent people are put in jail...I've watched so many cases on true crime shows where there was definitely reasonable doubt, yet the person is serving life without parole.

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  7. Yes, I do know some, but I was a cop for 25 years. The system is flawed in many ways and this is one of those ways.

    Have a fabulous day. ☺

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    1. I'm sure you know more about these issues than most people. I can't imagine what it's like to work hard to put someone in jail for a horrendous crime, only to watch them walk out 20 years later and know they're just out there...

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  8. This guy is mentally ill.

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    1. The problem with narcissistic personality disorders (along with all the others--psychopathic, sociopathic, etc.), is that they're permanent. Behavioral therapy can help but it isn't like mental illness where chemical imbalance can possibly be corrected with medicine. This guy won't get help for his issues now that he's out, I'm assuming, so he'll just take his self-involved stuff out into the world. The new people he meet likely won't be able to find much about him online, since my Google searches didn't bring up much (although maybe this blog will help!).

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  9. This is something that is going on around my town. A man who murdered two women while he was 17 is said to be up for parole and people around town don't like this, especially the families of the two women. I agree and feel the families don't deserve to see this happen.

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  10. I haven't met any that I know. However, I remember the chill I felt when I watched an FBI criminal profiler on television calmly state what serial killers begin to do after they stop killing. Apparently as they enter their later years, they lose an interest.
    I will say, I don't have much sympathy for anyone who takes someone else's life for money or a car. Emotional killing doesn't garner much sympathy from me but I do see it as less heinous but heinous.

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  11. It's a scary world we live in. I think that Life Sentence is too lenient, it should be Sentenced until Death.
    Luckily, I do not personally know anyone in jail for murder and I hope I never will.
    Hugs.
    JB

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  12. That is scary stuff. I can't think of any off the top of my head, but I'm sure they are out there! Crazy.

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  13. Have you ever heard of the Sylvia Likens torture/murder? I researched it in depth, thinking I might write a YA novel based on it, but I'm not sure I can stomach actually doing it.

    The people who killed her were released on parole, changed their names, and went on with their lives. Only one of them ever publicly expressed remorse and went on to do good in the world. The others blamed the victim for the rest of their lives.

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  14. Derrick Todd Lee, the Baton Rouge serial killer, died today!!

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  15. Can't say as I have ever known a murderer - far as one can can ever know, given it's not something often bragged about. In the case of the creep you speak of, the idea that he would be released in society is appalling. Surely they don't believe he's seen the error of his evil ways?

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  16. I better not find out that my doctor... I know (or knew) a murderer but he is locked up and probably will be for life. It is weird to think about him and some of our conversations before he killed two guys--I blogged about it years ago.

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  17. I remember that case very well. I was appalled!!!!

    Personally I don't know anybody out on bail. Our good friend is a corrections officer at a big prison, and the things he tells us about the
    special medical treatment prisoners get and many more things that make me choke!!!

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  18. That is so freaky! I did meet Barry Beach, but honestly I don't think he actually committed the crimes he served for. But if I did meet one of them, well, I'd hope they'd reformed their ways, that's for sure!

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  19. It would be nice if everyone reformed in prison, but that's not the case for many. They return to society doing the wrong thing again and again.

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  20. If the murderer has been reformed and changed I am not concerned. Yes, I do know of one, a female named Karla Homolka, and she came right out of prison to live here in Montreal. Personally I don't think she was rehabilitated, but as well, I do not think she is a danger to society. However, some do disagree on this.

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  21. It is chilling. I watched a news story that ran locally about a jail being overcrowded so they released several of the inmates early, but what they said next was that a nearby prison had been overcrowded so those folks were kept at the jail and some got released waaaaay early for some severe crimes.

    My brother in law's brother was shot and killed by a guy who should have been in prison, but got released early during one of these deals. Not pretty.

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  22. Thankfully I don't know any. Scary!

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  23. I remember hearing about that guy! No doubt I saw this on one of the many crime shows I watch. It's always scary to me when these people are released.

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  24. I don't know of any! True crime books do get me thinking about the people who haven't been caught too.
    ~Jes

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  25. I'd like to think that they could be rehabilit... You know, if there was a Dexter-like serial killer around who maybe watched out for people like this... Now, that's a story idea.

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  26. I can't believe I have not heard about this Anthony Pignataro, what a lunatic!

    Sadly enough, some crazed psychopath who was recently released from bail committed a double murder in my town! He killed his girlfriend's landlords (an elderly couple) all because they served an eviction notice. It's tragic and alarming to say the least.

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  27. A lot of criminals who have committed heinous acts get out of prison, while kids who get caught with a little pot are locked up for years.

    Love,
    Janie

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  28. Pretty scary. Lots of people who committed murders in their youth are out now, like novelist Anne Perry and Bernadette Protti, who stabbed a peer in high school to death because her victim had made the cheerleading team and she hadn't.

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  29. I don't think the sentence fits the crime these days. I don't believe in the death penalty but I don't agree that sentences should be too soft either, it should fit the crime. Why should a murderer be allowed their freedom when their victim has lost their life?

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  30. As you've probably noted on my blog, I'm very familiar with narcissists, and a few have committed heinous crimes. On the other hand, I've also met some people who lost it, were genuinely repentant, served time, got released and never got into trouble again. The key word is "narcissist". This is a person who literally has no conscience about committing harmful acts towards others, and has a sense of entitlement believing the world owes them. This is a serious psychiatric disease, and I'm already saying a prayer for the next woman this ex-doctor manages to con and charm into a relationship or marriage.

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  31. If you put things into perspective like this, it certainly does make the world a scary place. He may be limited in some areas but he is free in all the rest and the potential he has to harm other people makes my skin crawl. But it really is just how the justice system goes...

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  32. I don't know the numbers but I would def say that there are many people walking freely that have committed murder. Def more than the number who are not guilty yet can't walk free.

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  33. Can you imagine being married to someone like that? Yikes!

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  34. I know two killers who have served their 20 year "life" sentences. They haven't been freed yet, but the news coverage came up that it was discussed. Jail has been going well for them. They were low level members of two well-known hate groups when they were jailed at 16 and 18 (both tried as adults). They made contacts in prison and, I heard (or overheard) that they have much higher ranks now. I'm not sure how any prison committee wouldn't know that, but there is an overcrowding issue. Maybe jail isn't the crime deterrent it's supposed to be. Yes, some people come out reformed. But some come out worse. Or they don't come out worse, but then are treated as worse, and decide that it's easier to be how people see you than fight to be better. Either way, the system is certainly broken.

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    1. It is very, very sad. The victim looses, the family of three victim, and the perpetrator and their family looses. There are NO winners. The Justice system Destroys everyone and everything in its path. One of the main reasons IMO, people who go go to prison come out and continue to commit crimes is NOBODY WILL HIRE THEM. Well, no job that will give them a decent wage. There used to be a tax incentive for a few specific companies, like MacDonalds, but who in the h€ll wants to work in a MacDonalds.

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  36. That's... disturbing on so many levels. O_o Also proof that the real world is much, much stranger than fiction. Someone like that in a book would be considered almost too deliberately or cartoonishly evil to be believable, and yet, there he is, here in the real world. Yeesh!

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  37. Two classic examples: Two sisters killed their mother in Canada (feature on a true crime show), served their time and thanks to Canadian law, not only were they given new identities, but it's a crime to identify them under their new name.

    Same for a case in England back in the 90's. Two pre-teens kidnapped a child from a mall (again, made the news, true crime shows) and killed him with bricks. After they served their time, the were given new identities and per European Union (I believe), it's now a crime to public identify them under their new names.

    Father Nature's Corner

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  38. Fortunately, I don't know of anyone who has left parole and is on the streets. it is scary to know that's going on. Because really, how well does a prison reform an inmate? How many prisoners released don't harbor some form of resentment and/or revenge for someone and would be willing to give in to such under the most ideal circumstances for that to happen.

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  39. Glad I don't know any convicted murderers but it is scary how many evil people are released and are out there running around!

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  40. So where is he now?

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  41. Richard Diaz9/26/16, 10:55 PM

    So he was only charged with assault, because she lived and it was only pain and suffering... He should had been convicted of attempted second degree murder and received 40 years. Although even life would had been better as far as I am concerned as an American citizen. But Anthony was not eligible for the life sentence. However, he was eligible for a 40 year term. Prosecutors just didn't seek it and the Judge did not ask the jury to consider a charge of attempted second degree murder. His crime was beyond even first degree assault.

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  42. I was a prison counselor before I retired. Knew many murderers. The one case that got to me most was in my personal life. Ex- in law from one sisters family murdered the ex-sister in law from another one of my sisters. He made her kneel naked in front of him and shot her as her 22 yr old niece and 17 yr old daughter were walking in the door. He chased them through the house and killed them too then went out on the deck and shot himself. Nobody saw this coming. They were my neighbors before I had moved for my new job. I knew these people since I was a kid. It shocked our whole town. As the aunt to all kids involved, I unfortunately saw the fallout fist hand. It was so awful. He was perfectly normal just 20 minutes before at a dinner party. I am so glad we didn't have to go through the court system at least. For work: had one guy kill his gay lover with scissors- total psychopath. He wasn't on my caseload thankfully. Unfortunately he was assigned to a dingy under qualified counselor who signed off on his release after 15 years. I begged for a second review and went to the Managing PO and the Warden, siting many disturbing red flags. But because she was his assigned therapist they went on her word and out he went. I was just sick. I tried to keep tabs on him after he got out but he totally disappeared. I saw him walking down the street one day by chance years later and my young son was with me. He was looking out the window and said "that man is scary evil" when I look at who he was pointing at.... it was him. I talked with the counselor right before I retired and asked her how she felt he was going to cope on the outside and reiterated my concerns. She said "he's got his poetry. It's gruesome, but it's an outlet." Yikes! Needless to say I have some concerns in the MANY layers of paroling a convicted murderer. In my opinion, if their appeals have been exhausted and they rate high on the reoffend vehicles- they should stay in regardless what programs they complete or if they've been a model prisoner. They are model because of the strict regime and their charming demeanor. I can't imagine a killer only getting 4 yrs! Wow!

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  43. I am pretty sure he has changed his name and is now calling himself Anthony Houte, MD. I may be wrong however the picture on his website for "Tony Houte Cosmetique" looks just like him (well a picture from many years ago). If it is in fact Pignataro, he now claims to be a retired doctor and a "renown scientist". Pretty scary. You would have to be pretty full of yourself to open a cosmetic office in the same town in which you tried to kill your wife.

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