Monday, November 13, 2017

Mystery Monday: Holly Bobo Update

It's Monday, which means it's time for another...



Sometimes mysteries have resolutions. Those resolutions may not be pretty, but it's important to pay attention to them. After all, for every solved case, there are many other unsolved cases that may have similar explanations...


Such is the mystery of the sudden disappearance of Holly Bobo. I profiled this case here after we'd at least learned that her remains had been found and an arrest had been made. But we didn't know for sure who had killed (or how) until the case went to trial.



Holly was a college student who still lived with her parents in the tiny town of Darden, Tennessee. On the morning of April 13, 2011, she woke up early to study for an exam. Her last phone call that morning was at 7:42 a.m.--after that, all texts and calls went unanswered.



At 7:46 a.m., a neighbor heard a scream and called his mom, who relayed the information to Holly's mom, who was at work. At 7:50 a.m., Holly's brother Clint, who was the only other person at home with her, was awoken by dogs barking. He looked out the window and saw Holly and a male kneeling, facing each other. He could hear voices and said it sounded like she was upset. He heard her say, "No, why?"


A shot of the carport where Holly was last seen

Thinking the male he saw was Holly's boyfriend, Clint called his mom, who told him that wasn't the boyfriend. She told her son to "get a gun and shoot him." While Clint's mom called 911, Clint saw the man and Holly walk off toward the woods together. That was the last he saw of them.



More than three years later, Holly's partial remains were found 20 miles away by hunters. Also in 2014, the first arrests occurred in the case. 


Dylan Adams, Zach Adams, and Jason Autry
Zach Adams, his brother Dylan, and his friend Jason Autry were arrested and charged in the case. Zach was the first to go on trial in September. On September 22nd, Zach was found guilty of first-degree murder, especially aggravated kidnapping, and aggravated rape. He was sentenced to life without parole, along with two consecutive terms of 25 years. Despite no DNA linking anyone to the murder, the overwhelming number of witness testimonials made it difficult to doubt Zach was connected. (Although some still doubt it...)



The details of the crime are horrific (***WARNING***), serving as a reminder that sometimes mysteries are better off unsolved. What emerged was that Shayne Austin, who committed suicide in 2015, is believed to have been the one to kidnap Holly, taking her to his house where at least Zachary (and likely others) raped her. According to Autry's testimony, he showed up after the fact, hoping to buy drugs from Shayne Austin. Instead, he ended up helping Zachary dispose of Holly's body, only to find out she wasn't completely dead yet. Without getting into more detail than necessary, Adams resolved that problem with a gunshot...




The only good thing that comes of this is that Holly's family finally has answers...and justice. However, Holly's mother had to listen to details on what a group of boys did to her daughter. Two of the boys were once students of Holly's mother, who is a second-grade teacher.



Do you like to hear the resolution of unsolved mysteries? Or do you feel it's better not to know?

16 comments:

  1. Shame the brother didn't react faster. Why did she go outside when she was inside studying? Sick to know what happened, but we probably all imagine the worst anyway.

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  2. Ooh, how terrible this story is. But I am glad to read of the resolution of it. Better than not knowing.

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  3. It sounds like she knew these bastards and went with them because, I think, she was told some lie. Once she was caught, they had their way which is so very sad. These kids should hang. I think, it is always better to know but not sure the details are needed especially for the parents.

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  4. Hi Stephanie - definitely need to know ... as long as the correct person is guilty ... but ghastly - important to know. All the best - Hilary

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  5. It was great to hear how this was solved.

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  6. I would definitely want to know what happened, no matter how gruesome.

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  7. I always think it's best for the family to know. Maybe not the details, but as a mother I would also have sat in the courtroom and let these monsters know I was there for Holly. It's still a mystery as to why she went with him--probably a threat or a lie. It's good to let the world know when a mystery like this is solved. Hopefully, it will make someone who is planning such a monstrous act to realize they will probably be caught. Hanging is too good for these creeps. Turn them over to the mother of the victim. She'll know what to do with them.

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  8. How sad. Nothing could make the pain better. Each is its own special hell. Knowing or not knowing...it has to cut like a dull, rusty knife. My heart goes out to the family.

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  9. I would always rather know no matter what.
    In such a small town she knew these horrible guys. I hope they all get put away for life.

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  10. It's horrible what happened, but I'd want to know.

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  11. I'd rather know than wonder forever. I agree with Birgit that she left with them because of a lie.

    Love,
    Janie

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  12. As a mother, I would want to know that the guilty parties are caught and pay for their crimes. As for the details, that would be tough, but knowing might help the family to heal, if the murderers got what they deserved.

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  13. I know this would be tough to hear, but as a parent, I would want to know all the details, and that they had caught the right people. I would then have to work on forgiveness. Still, this had to be tough to take for the family. Hugs...RO

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  14. I like to know, when these stories have been solved, no matter how horrible! Prayers go out to the family!! So very sorry!

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  15. I've never needed details; I wanted answers and often justice for the victims.

    Anna from elements of emaginette

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  16. That would be rough to hear details about someone you had as a younger student. You'd be asking yourself if there had been something you did in their younger years that could have prevented it.

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