Monday, March 14, 2016

What Led Me to Poetry? Guest Blog by Lidy Wilks

Today I'm welcoming Lidy Wilks to my blog, but I'm also featured at the Unicorn Bell blog, so be sure to check that out!

I met Lidy not so long ago and I love her blog. So I was excited when I saw she had a book coming out. Today, she's here to tell us about the experience of writing poetry. Lidy's also giving away a $10 Walmart giftcard in a raffle linked below.

Take it away, Lidy!

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What Led Me to Write Poetry?
by Lidy Wilks

I first started writing poetry by writing rhymes. In the beginning, it was more for fun and it allowed me to delve deeper into my love for all things Halloweenish. It wasn't until later that I started to write poetry as an outlet and for inner reflection.



It all started when my mother transferred me out of the Catholic private school and into a public school. Changing schools had a huge toll on me. Granted, my mother could no longer afford the tuition, so it was off to public school. But as an introverted person, having to start all over again was something unfathomable to me. I had to leave behind six years worth of friendships and teachers I liked and respected. I didn't want to go and the school begged my mom to keep me enrolled until graduation in two years. Sad to say neither of us had no control over the matter. 

So I’d transferred in the 7th grade and my brother who was already a student there, had his own set of friends. So couldn't hang out with him and I'd much preferred to stay by myself. Discovering new worlds with every book I read. I was a flesh and blood cliche of ‘quiet as a mouse.’ And with my personality I hadn't made any friends for a long while. Who knew that it’d get me in trouble. Yet unbeknownst to me, I had made myself an enemy.

I don’t remember the girl’s name. But she was a fellow classmate and took pleasure in bothering me every chance she got. Even throwing paper balls at me during class once. Well, that day I had enough and I finally threw some back. But that was when she crossed the line. She read my words when she hadn’t the right. It was that day she became the second person I disliked most in the world.

Eventually, I found out why she hated me. She assumed herself that I thought I was better than everyone. Little old me, who was quiet and behaved in class, did the assignments and passed all her tests. Call me crazy, but isn't that a job of a student? Respect and listen to your teacher, do the assignments, etc. At least that was how I was brought up. Oh well. 




Looking back now, I guess you can say I kind of owe her. If not for her and not transitioning well to my new school, I wouldn’t have started writing poetry to figure out why people are the way they are. Why the world is the way it is. Writing poetry wasn’t just for fun anymore. It became the medicine relieving my aches and pain. To make me understand things I never knew or noticed before. And made me smile again. Leading me to write “A Rose Is A Lovely Flower.” My first published poem in my junior high school yearbook. To writing and publishing my first poetry chapbook. To writing and one day publishing my first full length poetry collection. And many more.




About the Book:

Debut poetry chapbook Can You Catch My Flow? captures the everyday ordinary events of the human condition in poetic snapshots. No matter the walks of life, the reader is sure to find themselves within the lines.

Bio:

Ever since she was young, Lidy Wilks was often found completely submerged in the worlds of Dickens, Louisa May Alcott, Sweet Valley High and Nancy Drew. She later went on to earn a Bachelor degree in English with a concentration in Creative Writing, from Franklin Pierce University. Where she spent the next four years knee deep in fiction, poetry and creative non-fiction Lidy is the author of Can You Catch My Flow? a poetry chapbook and is a member of Write by the Rails. She currently resides in Virginia with her husband and two children. And an anime, book and manga library, she’s looking to expand, one day adding an Asian drama DVD collection. Lidy continues her pursuit in writing more poetry collections and fantasy novels. All the while eating milk chocolate and sipping a glass of Cabernet. Or Riesling wine.

Links:



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60 comments:

  1. Her hate stemmed out of envy. Go figure.
    Readers and writers tend to dive into those things looking for an outlet or escape. It wasn't a fun experience for you, but as you said, you never would've discovered poetry if it hadn't happened.

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    1. Nope it wasn't fun at all. To this day, I still couldn't understand what I did to make her think that of me. Like you said it could've been envy. Or she was prejudiced against Catholic school kids. Or like most bullies, she must've had her own problems that she dealt with by projecting it on me.

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    2. People are mean for so many reasons at that age and it just sucks. As if adolescence isn't tough enough, some people deal with their own emotional issues by lashing out at others. There are people who were mean to me at that age and when I see them on Facebook, I still remember that. It's hard not to still take it personally even though it's obvious it was an issue they were going through at that time.

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    3. Yes they are. If they'd only stop and realize that lashing out at others is not a good way to deal with whatever problems you're going through.

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  2. It is through the hard times, you have discovered your talents.

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    1. Yeah, like how a rainbow sometimes appear after it rains. Sometime something good may happen from something bad.

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    2. I think often the people who had it rough in school become writers...although I think if you really check around, even the people we thought had it "easy" in school were going through tough times. Nothing is as it seems.

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    3. I agree. And it was Shakespeare who wrote that "All the world's a stage." So for those who seem to have it, even surrounded by people and putting on a show, still felt alone.

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  3. After labor and pain a new life emerges. You turned your wounds into something beautiful and wise. That other girl is probably still a wounded soul and has found someone else to pick on.
    Enjoy your success.
    JB

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    1. I always think of the Taylor Swift song "Mean" in situations like this. The perfect song for a teenager going through bullying situations because it's SO true! The bullied make something of their lives while the bullies so often don't.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jYa1eI1hpDE

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    2. Thank you Julia and I'm sure she did. I even remember she'd given my brother a hard time before too. Guess I was next. And really makes me wonder if she really did have a problem with Catholic school kids.

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    3. And thanks for sharing that video Stephanie. It's so true how in most situations the bullied make something more of themselves. Instead of tearing others down to make themselves feel better, bullies should learn to build themselves up and treat themselves and others better.

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  4. I had one girl I hated so much in junior high and high school. And I was picked on for very dumb things. I'm in the process of writing a memoir (I think that what it will be) and have recalled this among other things. Read my blog for more details.

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    1. Someone emailed me ten years ago randomly to apologize for picking on me in elementary school and I had NO IDEA what he was talking about. I'm sure he picked on me, but it didn't even bother me. While there are people I clearly remember being mean to me who probably haven't even given it a second thought. I try to remember that and not let that latter group of people take up any space in my head. They don't deserve it!

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    2. Oh girls can be vicious. But what's worse is that they moved on to cyber bullying now, smh. I worry about today's youth.

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    3. Wow, they emailed you? Well there are those who feel remorse for what they've done and try to make up for it. But like you, there's no space in my head for those mean people either. As far as I'm concerned, they don't exist. And I'm not going to waste time caring about them.

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  5. Wow! What a very interesting story. I, too went to a CAtholic school as a kid until going to a public high school, which just happened to be all female back in the day. It's funny how the things we go through early in life, shape what happens later on. I admire anyone who can write, but writing poems seems to be a special art that you've mastered well. Kudos on the new book, and I'm now headed over to your place. Love that Stephanie takes time to introduce us to new friends. Hugs...RO

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    1. Definitely add Lidy's blog to your list of must-visits. She's awesome!

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    2. Yes, every moment in life, big or small has the ability to shape us either for better or worse. Just depends on which side you want to nurture, the better or worse.

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    3. Aww, thank you Stephanie. :-D

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  6. Completely understand your journey, Lidy! Many who write from the heart have similar journeys, including me. I remember my bully by name, face, and smell. I hated her so much. So happy to be out of grade school and into grad school.

    My writing started with online gaming and poetry as well. I had to have that same outlet for the pain. Much of it has subsided, but there's always more to write about as time passes. It'll never get old. :)

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    1. Smell? That one caught my attention! I think at that age we are still trying to figure out who we are. When someone rejects us or makes fun of us, it helps form that opinion and we have to find a way to prove we aren't that person.

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    2. Yeah, a bully's actions remains with you. Though I've put the girl out of my mind to probably walk right past her now and not recognize her. But I can't forget the way she made me feel. Like there was something wrong with me for her to treat me that way. And the utter betrayal of having someone like her reading my stuff. Writing I've only shared with friends I trusted and liked. Now that is something I can't ever forgive her for to this day. And I was glad I never had to see her again once I graduated.

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    3. Yeah, adolescence sucks. And one thing I learned later in trying to get away from that formed opinion is that it's easy to get lost. Now I sometimes wished that someone told me that it's okay to be you. Even if others say you're weird. Because being normal is so overrated.

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  7. Through strife, you found your strength - isn't it wonderful? If that stinker girl only knew, she'd turn St. Patrick's green! I loved Nancy Drew!
    Best wishes and write on, Lidy ;-)

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    1. Thanks Diedre. Yes, there was light in the darkness. And as for the girl, yes, if she only knew. On the other hand glad to meet another Nancy Drew fan.

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  8. Poetry is such a powerful means of expression for many. Thanks for sharing your story!

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    1. It definitely helped putting voice to my thoughts, even if it was only words written with pen and paper.

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  9. Cool guest post.
    Publishing a poetry collection would be a dream come true to me. I'm trying to pass my 200 poem mark. I've been writing poetry since the late 80's, but I have a hard time finding people interested in reading them. I've experimented with various forms and styles.
    So cool for you to have a book published. Once again, great guest post.

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    1. Thanks Jeffrey. High five for trying to pass your 200 mark. And I'm sure you will, just keep writing and sharing what moves you, what you want to hold up a mirror to. Good luck!

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  10. What a delightful young woman. I'm so happy she took the good from a bad experience. Many don't.

    Have a fabulous day. ☺

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    1. Thank you Sandee. Hope you've had a fabulous day too! :-D

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  11. This is so awesome. Congratulations on your poetry collection being published!!

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  12. Having to change schools can be gut wrenching. I'm so sorry you had such a rough time, but glad it led to your poetry.

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    1. Changing schools was horrible. I was so lost and what saved me was reading and writing. The only saving grace from the move was that the school allowed you to leave the grounds during recess. Of course I took advantage of that to hang out at and get new books from the library.

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  13. I read somewhere (Rumi?) that poetry is the language of the heart. Which makes a lot of sense to me.
    I am so sorry that the poor sad and damaged person took her insecurities out on you, but it sounds as if her actions gave you a gift - with the pain.

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    1. Oh I like Rumi. He also said to "look inside yourself; everything that you want, you are already that." Even though she gave me a very unwelcome gift, I still obtained something wonderful. The continuing process of understanding myself and this world through poetry.

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  14. If I had a nickel for every time someone mistook my shyness for being uppity, I'd have a bowl full of change. Once I'm comfortable and know people, I am fine. But in a new situation or large group? Totally and completely awkward. Thank goodness for books to hide behind!

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    1. Oh I'm the same way. When it's a new and large group, it's like I'm thrown off my center. I don't know what to say. But with people I know, I'm comfortable and able to be more myself. And I wish people would understand that more. I'm an introvert so I just don't get energized socializing with large groups of people. That in no way means I'm uppity. Rather I get off being in smaller, quieter settings more. Especially with a book.

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  15. Isn't it amazing how what could have turned someone to do bad things, actually did the reverse. Great story.

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    1. Yes it is. And it is my hope that more kids would find a positive outlet to deal withe their problems. Bullying is a serious issue we need to tackle.

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  16. I hate when people mistake my shyness for being a snob. I've been there too, and all you can do is turn it into a positive :)

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    1. I don't get why they make that assumption. It reminds me of the video where Susan Cain gives a talk about being an introvert. She recounts when she went away to camp and was made to feel that she was being some kind of downer because she wanted to read a book. Because she wasn't socializing. If only they'd stop to think first that maybe they prefer to have fun differently from themselves. Or try to get to know them better first.

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  17. I wrote poetry about unpleasant people and situations numerous times. I also started writing it in middle school. I find that people dislike me for the craziest reasons. I haven't done anything to them and I find out they hate my talent and work ethic.

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    1. Sometimes you can't helped being envious of others. Yet that doesn't make it okay to take it out on others, the one(s) you're envious of. But like you, writing poetry about the unpleasant situations and people helped me. Made it easier to deal with it and move on. And at the end of the day, it's their problem. Not mine.

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  18. I wrote a lot of poetry in middle school and high school. Actually college too. I used it as an outlet for my hurt and anger about things. It is interesting how it can help to make us feel better.

    I am sorry that someone was cruel to you, but I think it is amazing that you can see the positive in it (that you are a writer). Wishing you all the best!

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    1. Thank you Stephanie. Poetry is therapeutic. Whether reading or writing, you're able to discover yourself and healing.

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  19. Thank you for sharing, ladies. I'm a bit of a poet myself, but aside from an anthology that was published last year, I haven't really done anything about my collection. Someday, someday.

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    1. Thanks for stopping by and congrats on the anthology. I'm sure your collection will happen someday soon. You're just on a little break for now.

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  20. Ah, school girls. Who knows why they take an instant dislike to anyone? Mostly, they just dislike themselves, but need an outlet for that anger.

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    1. Yeah, girls are a mystery. And I am one. Just glad I didn't go the same route as her and found a positive outlet for my emotions.

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  21. Nice to learn a little more about you Lidy. :-)

    Anna from elements of emaginette

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    1. :-D You know what's funny. I'd almost forgotten about her. The memory of it all just came back as I was writing this post.

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  22. Congratulations Lidy! Awesome to read about you.

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    1. Thank you. And glad you've enjoyed the post.

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  23. Poetry is a wonderful outlet for emotions.

    Hi Steph.

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    1. Yes it is. Wish more people found poetry or other means as outlets for their emotions.

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  24. Poetry is very therapeutic. Glad you found it.

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