Sunday, October 04, 2015

The Sister Solution: A Guest Post by Trudi Trueit

I'm SO excited to have a fellow Aladdin M!x author on my blog today. Trudi was one of my favorite Aladdin M!x authors before I was published by that imprint...and now we're publisher sisters! Speaking of sisters...Trudi is here today to talk to us about the complexities of sisterhood. It goes perfectly with the theme of her new book, The Sister Solution, which is on sale now!

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Sisters

by Trudi Trueit

As a girl, I read Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women again and again. Not only because I closely identified with Jo’s fierce determination to be a writer, but also because the book so accurately expressed the true nature of sisterhood, which can be summed up in one word: complicated. Let’s make that two words: very complicated. Jo, Meg, Amy, and Beth laughed and played, huffed and squabbled, nurtured and comforted, fought and forgave, just the way my older sister and I did. One moment my sister and I could be quarreling about whose turn it was to use the curling iron and the next we were uncontrollably giggling over a secret joke at the dinner table. We could play competitive games for hours, but one wrong word said at the wrong time could bring either one of us to tears. Sisterhood is a powerful thing—an enigmatic, glorious, agonizing, powerful thing.


So it’s no wonder writing a story about two young sisters, who are complete opposites, trying to navigate their relationship was a bit daunting. The Sister Solution brewed in my head for a long time before I started writing it. I mean, how do you package up the crazy kaleidoscope of sisterhood into one book? When I was ready to write, I decided to tell the story from thirteen-year-old Sammi’s (the older sister) point of view. However, I hadn’t written more than a few chapters when Sammi’s little sister, Jorgianna, 11, tapped me on the shoulder and said, “Excuse me, but that’s not how it happened.” That’s when I realized I was going to have to do what every parent does, and give each sister equal time (or as equal as I could given the constraints of the job) to tell her side of the story. 

As I wrote, I realized there was one other thing I needed to do for the sake of sisters everywhere, and that was not to allow the novel to sink into cliché territory. I didn’t want to portray Sammi and Jorgianna in the way I’ve seen sisters characterized too often in books, movies, and television as mean, vindictive, one dimensional characters. You know the drill, Sister A steal’s Sister B’s—fill in the blank—boyfriend, husband, dream job, life, etc. Why is one sister always pitted against the other anyway? Instead, I wanted to pit the world against them. I wanted Sammi and Jorgianna to learn to become a team, to figure out how to hold onto one another when everything around them was conspiring to pull them apart. Sammi and Jorgianna learn to brave the strong winds of life’s tornado and come out stronger individuals and closer sisters.

I can’t say I understand the mysterious and powerful nature of sisterhood any more fully after writing The Sister Solution, but I can say I have learned not to take it for granted. Like Jo in Little Women, I have discovered, “I could never love anyone as I love my sister.”



Blurb:

The Sister Solution is the story of two sisters, who are complete opposites, and their longing to understand and connect with one another. Thirteen-year-old Sammi is a soft-spoken, practical thinker, while eleven-year-old Jorgianna is a free-spirited, fun-loving artist. When Jorgianna gets bumped up two grades to join her sister in the eighth grade, it’s a tough blow to Sammi’s ego, as well as her social life (especially when Jorgianna gets accepted into the popular crowd that Sammi has been dying to join). Sammi’s “solution” to handling this infringement into her world is to create a contract with Jorgianna, stipulating that they won’t talk, text, or acknowledge each other in any way, while at school. Of course, this move backfires in ways she never predicted and it isn’t long before she’s backpedaling to keep everything from falling apart.

Bio:

Trudi Trueit knew she’d found her life’s passion after writing (and directing) her first play in fourth grade. Since then, she’s been a newspaper journalist, television news reporter and anchor, media specialist, freelance writer, and is now a children’s book author. She has published more than forty fiction and nonfiction titles for young readers and lives near Seattle, Washington.






Contact info:

47 comments:

  1. Wonderful thoughts indeed, thanks for sharing and greetings!

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  2. Glad brotherhood isn't very complicated. More like just plain odd.
    Congratulations, Trudi!

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    1. Female relationships always seem to be slightly more complicated than male!

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  3. Looks like a great read. I don't have a sister, but find books and movies about sisterhood interesting.

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  4. I saw Little Women years ago but it's only this year that I've got round to reading the book, it's such a great story and I think The Sister Solution sounds good too.

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    1. I loved that book as a kid. That's where I first heard about scarlet fever...I thought it was such a beautiful disease name. What can I say? I was a kid. Kids have weird thoughts1

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  5. Congratulations to Trudi! I find it interesting that you said you did not want you sisters pitted against each other -- that you wanted it to be the two of them against the world. Yet, the blurb highlights a conflict between them and a contract not to interact at school. I love the idea of you pursuing your theme by (outwardly) sending them in the opposite direction. Brilliant!

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    1. She did such a great job with that. She's a genius.

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    2. Thanks, Dianne and Stephanie! And yes, you make a good point. I should have been a little more clear on my take on conflict. You do have to have some sibling rivalry in a sister tale, of course, but when it came to the main plot line, I wanted Sammi and Jorgianna to work as a team to take on the mean girls, as opposed to grappling with each other!

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  6. Sounds like a cute plot. Good luck with the book.

    Betty

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  7. Good to stray away from the hollywood cliche stuff. I always ignored my sister lol

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  8. Congratulations Trudi. The book sounds interesting. I don't really understand about sisterhood since I'm an only child but I do have a best friend that feels like a sister to me.

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  9. I love the way you chose to make the sisters a team. You're right that you so often see sister book's as nothing but a rivalry. Sisters always fascinate me, as I never had one myself (and always wanted one!)

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  10. Trudi, congratulations! I have an elder sister but is she is so much older than me by 13 years difference and she is more like mom to me!

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  11. I like the team part the best. That's the key to success. She also allowed teamwork in her research. Teamwork rocks.

    Have a fabulous day. ☺

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  12. As the only girl in the family I always wanted a sister. Sooooo much. And still do.

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  13. I love reading everyone's comments! Sisters are definitely one of those 'can't live with 'em can't live without 'em' relationships. Thanks for hosting me, Stephanie!

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  14. Sounds like a wonderful story.
    And Little Women...a classic.

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  15. Sisters... Something I never had, so I wouldn't know what it's like. But I do know what it's like to have a brother.

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  16. My sister and I are 11 months apart, that's right. My mom went in for her 8 week check up and the doctor told her she was pregnant...again.

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  17. Sounds like my two daughters separated by a couple years. I'm sure a lot of people will relate to this story.

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  18. Sadly, in my case, I have never had any brothers or sisters and am an only child. My parents lost 5 children before I was born, 4 were miscarried and the 5th one (a boy named Richard) died at the tender age of 7 months from bronchial pneumonia. I was born in October 1956, just two months short of my mother's 41st birthday! Wonderful post, thank you so much for sharing.

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  19. I read this while giggling--it's so very true! Sisterhood is a very complicated thing. I love my sister dearly, though there have certainly been times where we've argued at length!

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  20. Sounds like a good story. I have a younger sister, and yes, it can get complicated, but I love her with my whole heart. I also have 4 daughters, and I can see how sisters relate and it makes me smile.

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  21. this just sounds adorable. I love the M!X line. I don't have a sister but I have a brother and he's my best friend. I could never ever be an only child, but I also could never be the oldest, b/c I'm kind of a brat lol and growing up the youngest (and being the first girl) was really fun b/c you can get away with more. I just adore sibling relationship stories in books!

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  22. Sounds like a great book. Definitely NOT the relationship I ever had with my own sister.!

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  23. What a cool-sounding story! As an only child, I've only been a spectator to sisterhood, and it's a truly mysterious bond. Much success with it, Trudi!
    Guilie @ Quiet Laughter

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  24. This book sounds so good! I love my sister, and love to read stories that portray siblings in a real way, not the usual cliche. I look forward to reading this!

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  25. This sounds fantastic!!! Sisters share such a unique bond, and yes, there's no shortages of sisters, but I like you're making them a team against whatever comes at them. Congratulations, Trudi!

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  26. sounds like a good story!

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  27. Hope you had a pleasant, productive day, Steph.

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  28. Love the extra effort not to make the sisters a cliche. And yay for Little Women. I love that book.

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  29. I need to get a copy of this for my sister and me. We're not kids anymore but can remember those days. Cute cover.

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  30. Lovely story-- added to my light-reads TBR :)

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  31. This sounds like a fun read for a child! I too loved 3 little women. :)

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  32. Sisters who are so different will make for some interesting reading! Congrats on your book.

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  33. It sounds like a great book that so many young girls will be able to relate to and take comfort in.

    I'm an only child, but when I wished for a sibling, it was always an older brother I wanted, not a sister. Maybe I missed out.

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  34. This sounds like a lot of fun. I always wished I had a sister.

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  35. The book looks wonderful. I always wanted a sister. Luckily I have a great sister in law.

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  36. Sounds like an interesting and fun book. Great concept.

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  37. Trudi, your book looks amazing. Sisters do have a special bond.

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  38. Love the cover and the story line is perfect.

    Hey, Steph.

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