Wednesday, November 05, 2014

Does Sugar Really Make Your Kids Hyper?

Today 25 Roses is featured on The Secret Files of Fairday Morrow. Check it out!




Now for today's blog...

Halloween is over, but the candy still remains. In most houses, at least a few pieces of sweet stuff stick around in the days and weeks after the big night.



Moms cringe when they see their children downing those morsels of candy every night. Do they really want a houseful of hyper children?



For decades, there has been one prevailing thought about children and sugar. It was passed down from our great grandparents to our grandparents to our moms. And we just keep passing it along. Sugar makes us hyper, right? Our moms told us so.




Since kids get hyper after eating sugar, adults therefore assume if they're feeling tired in the afternoon, a little office birthday cake will do the trick.



Wrong. Sugar doesn't make kids or adults hyper. At all. Separate research studies published in the Journal of the American Medical Association and Journal for Abnormal Child Psychology showed that sugar had no more impact on a child's behavior than a placebo. In fact, in one instance researchers found moms rated their children as more hyperactive when they thought they'd had sugar and they actually hadn't. To be technical about it...



"If you’re energy depleted (i.e. an elite athlete), fructose can be converted to glycogen (liver starch) as a storehouse for ready energy, which can then be fished out of your liver if your body needs glucose in the future (for more exercise or if you’re starving). But most of us aren’t energy depleted, so fructose gets turned into liver fat, driving insulin resistance."--Time Magazine.

What myth have you found still persists in our society today, despite scientific evidence to the contrary?

117 comments:

  1. Hey, you're on Jess's site! Will stop by next.
    You want a surge of energy, eat carbs. Distance runners have known that for years. It's not the sugar that is energy, it's carbs.

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    1. So true. I don't run, but I've always heard that. Your comment reminded me of that scene on The Office where Michael Scott ate a big bowl of pasta before that marathon.

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  2. I never felt sugar helped give me energy... at least nothing lasting...

    I was thrilled to find out that although we were told often that liver was good for us... it's been proven that any benefits are outweighed with nasty stuff in it...I was happy :-)

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    1. They seem to go back and forth on what's good/bad for us on a daily basis. Yesterday I was assigned to write about a study that showed that after age 60, moderate alcohol consumption can good for your memory, so that's a good thing! I also get all happy when they say chocolate is good for us. I just ignore the stuff about broccoli and asparagus being good for us because, come on! We already KNOW that.

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  3. Great topic! I have to say, it always annoyed me when people blamed their kid's behavior on sugar. Um, no, your kid is always out of control!!!

    My mom and various other people still believe you can get sick by being outside in cold weather without a hat, etc. Drives me nuts!

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    1. Oh wait...is that what it is? Parents are using it as an excuse for poorly-behaved children? Now it makes a little more sense... I've told a couple of people that sugar has been proven not to have an effect, but they always just dismiss those studies. Denial!

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  4. It's a great excuse to keep your kids from the sugar, right? They don't need to know:)

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    1. Now THAT is true. I am a little concerned that kids are starting on Starbucks so young. I think coffee has replaced soda as the national addiction...

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  5. I was always told that about sugar as well. And ditto Alex.

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    1. Yeah, most people don't really think about the science behind what they eat. I can include myself in that, as well!

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  6. yep, outside USA nobody ever mentions sugar as something that will make you go hyper. Probably because we don't eat, or can't buy, as much candy as your kids do.

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    1. That's interesting! I do know they've removed unhealthy foods from schools. In high school we had a vending machine filled with candy bars...I had plenty of friends who would have a Twix and Coke for lunch every day.

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  7. The myth that drives me NUTS is "The flu shot gives me the flu". NO IT DOESN'T! GAH!!!! I love the cat about to do science graphic! Bwahahaha! --Lisa
    Ps. I just downloaded "30 Days of No Gossip" to my daughters Kindle. It looks so good! She was just telling me this morning that she finished a book last night and was looking for a new one! Perfect timing!!

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    1. Thank you SO much! That's so exciting!

      Muscle aches are the only symptom I've ever had. I think back in the old days the shot could actually give someone symptoms and people cling to that. My personal opinion is that people just like to make up excuses because they don't want to bother with it...or they don't like being poked with a painful needle.

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  8. Gosh, now I want some cake and then a nice long nap.

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    1. Yeah, that episode of Seinfeld always tends to make me crave cake.

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  9. I don't know about sugar making kids hyper or not but when my granddaughter was little her mom warned me not to give her chocolate as it would make her hyper. She was a quiet little girl very well behaved. Sure enough, I let her have just one Hershey's chocolate bud and shortly after she was practically climbing up the wall. What a change just on little chocolate bud made in her behavior.
    I don't know what it was but it made her extremely hyper.

    Hugs,
    JB

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    1. I know experts have said that many times, parents think it's the sugar but they say it's actually the caffeine in the chocolate they're eating. I think the amount of caffeine in chocolate is fairly small (unless eaten in large amounts!) but in a child that isn't caffeine addicted like the rest of us, even a small amount can have an impact.

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  10. I know you are right, but I don't believe it...What? Sorrry, i'm old. One thing for sure, too much sugar is a bad thing, soda in particular is probably the worst. It is addicting and leads to overweight people and diabetes. Many experts believe it is a slow poison.

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    1. Yeah, sugar's pretty bad--it's also bad for your teeth! I was surprised in my stepdaughter's high school, they allow them to have diet soda with lunch but not regular soda. I understand the sugar's bad, but diet soda? Really? Most adults don't even drink diet soda anymore. I do--about one a day--but I know the health risks and I guess I'm living on the edge!

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  11. Oh yeah, I read an article about this a while back! They must be hyper because they think sugar makes them hyper. Sometimes I wonder if some energy drinks or energy bars, etc. have the same effect on people, and maybe coffee is a placebo to some extent, too. Who knows?! This is sort of unrelated, but I am floored by how many people still think that cutting your hair makes it grow longer/faster. Is it still a mystery that hair grows from your scalp and not from the ends? O_O

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    1. I think you are SO right on that--it's amazing what the mind can convince us. Research has shown that for someone who is addicted to caffeine, consuming caffeine actually does nothing but prevent caffeine withdrawal symptoms. Yet people are convinced that coffee wakes them up... Yes, I've heard hair stylists laugh at that hair growth myth!

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  12. Huh, really?? I hadn't heard that! Wow. Ok, so sugar just makes us sick, not hyper. Well, I can get on board with that - an even better reason not to eat too much sugar!

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    1. Sugar is bad, but it tastes SO good! I say everything in moderation... Some people live their lives in such fear of shortening it, they never really enjoy themselves. If sugar makes you happy, have a little every day!

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    2. (Unless you're diabetic, of course!)

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  13. i usually experience more of a crash after too much sugar than a rush. combine it with alcohol and i need a nap!

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    1. Someone told me that sugary drinks actually help alcohol somehow? They keep you from feeling its effects as quickly or something...? Alcohol definitely makes me sleepy but for some reason they say it actually can keep you from being able to sleep although I have no idea how that works! Maybe we just know too much these days.

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  14. Thankfully sent the Halloween candy in to hubby's store where kids come in all the time, LOL :)

    its funny how the medical community goes up and down about things. Sometimes something is good for you, sometimes it is not. Mark my word, somewhere down the road there will be a study that says eating sugar is actually good for your health :)

    betty

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    1. Chocolate's good for us--that was all I needed to hear! One of the few things I miss about working in an office is having a place to take all my leftover candy on November 1st. Working from home, the last thing you want is a bunch of leftover candy!

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  15. So let me understand this: I would have been just as hyper after eating boiled turnips than I would have been, as a child, eating candy? and all that 'Don't stuff your face with hallowe'en candy, it'll make you crazy!' was untrue? My world is rocking and I am ready to fall to my knees in gratitude that Mom didn't get it into her head to stuff me with turnips which, I am convinced, they serve in Hell. (thank you for the info and the hearty laugh!)

    That is a great review of Roses!

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    1. LOL, Diana. Your mom might have saved you from life as a diabetic, though!

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  16. I am aware of that science but I dispute it:) Carbs are not good in huge amounts. There is sugar and carbs in almost everything and it has also been found to be the most addictive. I have a sweet tooth, inherited by my dad, I used to drink coke, eat chocolate, French fries etc.... I started to sleep, more and more, fall asleep in restaurants, heart palpitations, nausea, fainting, couldn't concentrate, slur my words, night terrors, cold all the time, anger and other emotional upheavals. It took almost a year but after have a glucose tolerance test it was found that I was hypoglycemic. I produce too much insulin. Many Dr's don't believe in it yet it is there. What's funny, one eats more sugar and carbs because it gives a false sense of energy but then my body drops fast and that spells trouble. Do I cheat, yes which is strange but it is so hard since I have that sweet tooth and love chocolate. Essentially I can't have any sugar, starch or caffeine because it converts to sugar too fast in my system releasing too much insulin where I look like I am in overdrive and really hyper and then 20 min later, I crash and fall asleep and mumble and get cold etc... A simple diet changed everything. It's a tough diet but it works. I can have whole wheat pasta since it takes longer to process same with long grain rice. No potatoes except for a bakes one once per month. No bananas! They are horrible for me as I get an instant headache and feel nauseous and ill. They are a great food item and there is a reason they are used for runners etc... because it is converted fast. Scientists said, back in the 80's that eggs and butter were bad for you and had these tests to prove it. Now they say butter isn't bad and having eggs -the same. It is all in moderation. I do feel sugar and starch is a big no no in this society and that is what most people eat. I do believe in the old fashioned things our parents said. Scientists used to say Chicken noodle soup did nothing for a cold and now they say the opposite:)

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    1. Oh sugar definitely isn't good for you. I don't know if they've disputed the sugar crash, just that it makes people more hyper after eating it. There is a blood sugar drop that is related to the tired feeling people feel after eating sugar, I know.

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  17. Well, I didn't know this. I do know that certain foods can and do affect us in different ways.

    Have a fabulous day. ☺

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    1. Definitely! And it can be different for each person.

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  18. We still have candy from last year!

    I've taken to believe that children will be hyper regardless of what they consume. We do try to keep the sugar level down, just because of fat conversion, and the impact on teeth. We just make sure our kids avoid caffeine. *shiver* That wouldn't be a good combination. :)

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    1. Kids will definitely be hyper! I grew up in an era where we didn't know about ADHD and ADD, too. Maybe it wasn't as prevalent back then but we know a lot more now than we did even back then. Maybe with the next generation, they'll actually have a way to cure all the things we've discovered!

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  19. What about us empty-nesters who bought bags and bags to give out at Halloween?Because seriously you never know how many trick-or-treaters there might be :) and now we have huge amounts left over for dessert every night while watching TV and though it's not good for me--I sleep like a baby.

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    1. I'm SO with you! We're in a neighborhood where most of the parents now take their kids to the nearby church for trunk-or-treat. This year we just turned our light out and went out for the evening. No point in even bothering when it's only 10-20 kids the whole night and half are 15-year-olds who aren't wearing costumes!

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  20. I will wholeheartedly disagree. My 8 year old was completely out of control until we cut sugar cereals and anything without natural sugars from his diet. Seriously. You couldn't get the kid to focus for more than 2 seconds in a row. I've found studies can be manipulated to say whatever researchers want them to say (thank you statistics class!), but the proof comes from your own experience. AND what's true for one person may not be for another.

    Unleashing the Dreamworld

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    1. As Pat mentioned below, it could depend on the person's body.

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  21. Hm. Crap that everyone believes? How about urban legends? Like... WALT DISNEY IS NOT FROZEN!!!

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    1. I knew someone (no names) who thought Olivia Newton-John was once married to Elton John.

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    2. I know someone who thinks that the controversial talk show host of the 1990s (now deceased), Morton Downey, Jr., was the brother of actor Robert Downey, Jr. Think about that. If it were true, what would their father's name have been?!?

      She also thinks that actor/comedian Albert Brooks is the son of actor/writer/director Mel Brooks. Not so. Albert Brooks' real name is -- believe it or not -- Albert Einstein! His real-life dad was a radio comedian who couldn't resist naming his son after "thew" Albert Einstein.

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    3. I meant "the" Albert Einstein, obviously...

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  22. It just seems like another thing parents use to blame for their kids not knowing the word no. Oh it was the sugar, pffft. But that said, each person's body acts different ways, sugar can do nothing to many but make some hyper. Just like wheat does nothing to many but makes me half dead, depends on the body/genetics/whatever. I say cut it out altogether though as it helps cancer cells thrive, supposedly, plus makes people fat.

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    1. Cancer loves sugar. I wish I could cut it out of my diet, but it's not just sugar--you have to cut carbs, as well, I think? Potatoes, bread...I'd just starve.

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  23. I've always wondered if this was true, because I never felt more hyper after eating sweets as a kid, so it's nice to know it's false.

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  24. interesting--I have friends whose kids always seem to be a lot more obnoxious after a cookie haha but then again i always chalked it up to them getting their way and being giddy about it rather than being on a sugar high...when I was little I honestly NEVER felt any more hyper when I would eat sugar, but as I've gotten older I noticed I'm instantly happy when I have chocolate. Not sure if it really does affect the brain chemicals but it always makes me feel super happy.

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    1. I think it was in one of those articles I linked that other factors can cause that hyperactivity, including the fact that they're often consuming it while around other kids and having fun, which causes them to be more hyper. Chocolate has caffeine, so if the cookies have chocolate... Now I DEFINITELY notice a difference in my mood with chocolate. There are far worse indulgences.

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  25. I never actually see a difference with sugar or no sugar with my 4-year-olds . . . they're just naturally hyper all the time lol. Cool to know it's just a myth though ;)

    S.K. Anthony: My Writing Quirks—IWSG (16)

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    1. I honestly don't know how to tell the difference with most children. They always seem to have enough energy for 100 adults!

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  26. I have Type1 diabetes and when my blood sugars crash, I have to eat sweets. In those extreme instances, sugars take me from a very hyper state to one of extreme tiredness. Other than that, I don't eat sugars and I have no kids, but it seems to me that some kids are just more hyper than others. And those chubby ones feasting on doughnuts and sodas appear more sluggish than the skinny ones. An interesting post. .

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    1. I was watching Mick Fleetwood on TV this morning as I was reading over these comments and thinking, "You know, as paranoid as so many people are about health, it seems genetics plays a HUGE part in it." You see all these rock stars who lived hard lives back in the day and they live to be 100. (Or maybe they just LOOK 100!) Then you see health nuts who die of cancer at 50. I know living well can prolong a person's life, but it's just so weird to see that people who drink and smoke live so long. Obesity seems to be deadlier than anything, especially in men.

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  27. I'm a sugar addict. It's like caffeine but then I hit those terrible lows. Or like people say I crash! I never fed my kids candy or too much sugar when they were young, don't want to start Mom's bad habits.

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    1. My niece didn't have sweets until she went to a Mother's Day Out program and they had birthday cake for someone's birthday. From then on, she was hooked. (I swear, a love for sweets must run in our family!) But before then, I remember being amazed that she thought prunes were a HUGE treat. When you've never tried real sweets, it's amazing the perspective you develop on it.

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    1. When I worked in an office and we had birthday cake, I remember always having that sugar crash, especially if we did it in the morning before lunch. I would get a headache and feel very tired. It didn't make me feel energetic immediately after--even with that much sugar. Mostly when I eat sugar in big quantities, the only thing I feel is regret!

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  29. A fun but informative read. Sugar isn't really good even for adults. Well, too much sugar that is.

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  30. I've known people who believed that being pregnant affected the enamel on one's teeth. Supposedly the baby sucks off the enamel for his/her own use. Balderdash! I never believed in the sugar=hyper thing. Maybe it's because my mom never said anything about it. She didn't care if we had sugar.

    Love,
    Janie

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    1. I have heard that babies take from the mom what they need if the mom isn't well nourished, but I can't see how that would apply specifically to enamel. Maybe calcium, but that would affect the tooth as a whole, right? Not just the enamel! I had to write an article about whitening toothpastes and apparently too much of it can potentially damage the enamel of the tooth.

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  31. So many myths find their way into our consciousness. My mother always told us that if you had any part of you out of the car window, another car would come by and knock it off.
    I am not going to admit how old I was before I realised that if the car was that close we were going to have an accident anyway. And I still don't leave bits of myself dangling outside the car...

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    1. That's so funny! I guess if you got too close to a mailbox and your arm was extended all the way off, you could suffer a broken bone or something. Even if it was physically possible to hit something that was extended to the car, I think our body parts are attached well enough that they wouldn't completely disconnect from our bodies, though!

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  32. Oh yes this drives me crazy when that argument is used. If it were true I'd be going non stop and never get drowsy. Oh the things I could get done! #LovesSweets

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    1. True! Water energizes me more than sugar, actually!

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  33. One I've been looking into is Red 40. I notice a difference in my kids' behavior when they do or don't have it, so I'm curious to see what I find out. :)

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    1. I saw something recently about how the dark dye in syrups and sodas can cause cancer. SO not only are we supposed to cut out soda, we're also supposed to eat only natural syrup on our pancakes.

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  34. I actually knew this one! I remember reading that often times it's situational. As in situations where kids get a ton of candy are going to amp up their energy anyway. Like birthday parties, Halloween, etc. They're excited! It's fun times! Lol.

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    1. Yep, that's what it says. Some have disagreed in the comments, so take it for what it's worth.

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  35. Wise tales like this make me crazy..people really believe them. Did you see Jimmy Kimmel's videos of parents telling kids they ate all of their Halloween candy? Hilarious

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    1. That would be heartbreaking!!! I assume he did it in a funny way.

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  36. The problem with that cake (or yesterday's box of office doughnuts, which I was strong enough to refuse) is that they taste great, but sit like a lump in our stomachs and then an hour later we're hungry again. I'm munching on apples and carrots at work now and just the act of eating crunchy food is much more satisfying.

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    1. I do remember feeling horrible after eating birthday cake when I worked in an office. On the rare instances I eat dessert now, it's at night so it doesn't seem to have the same effect. Too much sugar in the morning tends to make me shaky. I think it's a blood sugar thing.

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  37. Well, the whole diary myth bit the dust the other day. I barely learn the dietary guidelines before they change them.

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    1. I know--it's impossible to keep up. I think the rule to stay healthy is: if it tastes good, spit it out. That pretty much covers it!

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  38. The idea that getting cold makes you sick is one that I find a lot of people believe. Some people almost talk themselves into getting sick if they've been cold or gotten wet when it's windy, and it always makes me slap my forehead, especially if it's the next day. I want to clue them in to this thing called an incubation period, but I often find myself shouting into the void. Sugar definitely falls into that category of beliefs that are deeply held and hard to set aside with something as logical as science. Oh well...

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    1. From what I understand, the only reason getting cold/wet might make you sicker is that it makes your nose run, which causes you to wipe it, thereby spreading germs. I know germs spread in warm weather more than cold, or so I've heard.

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  39. I figured as much, Never affected me from what I can tell.

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  40. Yeah, even though the statistics say that sugar doesn't affect hyperactivity, I'm on the fence about that one. I've never sat down and took note of the times my boys seem extra hyper and figured out if they'd had sugar that day, but I do think there is some correlation in my own children. And definitely those red dyes. I hear they are awful for kids, especially those with ADHD, so I do try to be mindful of that. The biggest problem is that EVERYTHING has sugar in it. Even foods and spices you wouldn't think of! My husband recently did a 21 day sugar detox, and he had to eliminate so many things from his diet. Also, it's amazing how your body goes through withdrawals when it doesn't have that sugar. Crazy, but true! Great post, Stephanie! :)

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    1. Someone mentioned red dyes above, too. This is the first I've heard of that--wasn't there also a problem with red dyes in M&Ms back in the 70s or something?

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  41. Oh I didn't know about that but that's true. I'll have to think to find something else, it's too early for that here lol.

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    1. My brain doesn't work until later in the day, either.

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  42. That's a good question. One I'll ponder as I fall asleep. In just a bit.

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  43. Being a type 1 diabetic, I have a very tight fisted relationship with sugar. I believe, though, that it's a blessing in disguise. If I did not have diabetes, I believe that I would weigh about 300 pounds because I ADORE anything with sugar and having to settle for one small bite is HARD.

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    1. I think we all need to learn that moderation, actually. Often one bite can be enough, but we keep eating. If we could learn to settle for just one bite, maybe we could have sweets more often.

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  44. I'm no scientist, but one of my guy friends growing up says different. Whenever he'd eat sugar the change from normal to bouncing-off-the-wall was near instantaneous. Maybe it was just the whole placebo thing, or he was just a brat. *shrugs*

    Carmel @ Rabid Reads.

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    1. The paragraph I pasted into the blog (because I didn't trust myself to paraphrase!) mentions that for those who aren't energy depleted, the liver turns the glucose into fat. I wonder if something about that process in some people is different for whatever reason. Maybe in some people the body uses sugar differently???

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  45. This is very interesting! I have never reacted that way to sugar and neither have my children so...it makes sense to me. ;)

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    1. It does nothing for me. I wish it did. I could have an excuse for eating sweets!

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  46. Didn't really think about whether this was a myth or not. Interesting though. Kids get excited about loads of stuff.

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    1. Kids always have tons of energy. Wish they could sell some of that energy to us!

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  47. Great point! And where to even start on things that people think about science that are totally wrong? It's what I teach and I am constantly baffled by things people generally accept as true. Like that every trait we have is governed by one gene with just a couple of alleles (simple Mendelian genetics)--how is that even logical? (Sorry, nerd alert here!)

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    1. What also amazes me is the # of things that are erroneously posted and shared on sites like Facebook. 30 years ago, I'd understand it, but we have Google now.

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  48. Hi Stephanie! Wow, this post has really hit a nerve, hasn't it? (Btw, love the video of Mike Meyers. I completely remember that skit on SNL.) I know sugar gets me going, that's all I can say. I am a nurse, so I understand the sugar/glycogen thing. Can't really explain it I guess!
    Having a hyper Thursday!
    Ceil

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    1. Chocolate gets me going, for sure! Maybe it's the happy hormone! Yeah, I didn't quite appreciate the Mike Myers skit when I was in my 20s, but I get it now!

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  49. I think the myth was perpetuated by parents looking for an excuse not to let their kids eat candy.

    I'm going to go hop over and see your featured book.

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    1. Several people have said that and I think in some cases, I agree. Oh, the tales parents tell their children!

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  50. Okay, so LOL on the pictures and gifs! They made my morning. :D I too did some research a few years back on sugar and it's possible contribution to hyperactivity...and also found that it was a myth. Everything should be in moderation, from coffee, to sugar, meats, and cake. Wait. Not Cake. I take that back. :)

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    1. I know a lot of writers drink the heck out of some coffee. I think it can be good for you but not in mass quantities.

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  51. This reminds me of being told as a kid that I shouldn't eat chocolate because it caused acne.

    As an adult I found out I had cystic acne that was only effectively treated with Accutane. Still pissed that I missed out on all of that chocolate, for such a silly reason!

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    1. That's right--I think I heard that food doesn't contribute to acne, right? I can't remember the last I heard about that!

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  52. I feel so much better. Thank you! For years, I've heard parents talk about the sugar highs- and my kids never got them. Sugar had no effect on my youngsters, so I figured me, being the bad parent that I was, had built them up an immunity. Now it's just science.

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    1. If you could build up an immunity to sugar, I would have over the years, for sure!

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  53. Most people who have eaten candy as an older kid should have already known this when they didn't themselves get hyper then they ate some candy.

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    1. The power of the mind. It's amazing what we can convince ourselves. A study a few years ago found that people who are addicted to caffeine don't get any benefits from it aside from avoiding withdrawal side effects...but people still believe that cup of coffee in the morning makes them more alert.

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  54. Given the amount of sugar I ate when little I should have been a diabetic by now. Sugar burns quite easily, although not everybody burns it the same way.

    Greetings from London.

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  55. Well, I am going to be devil's advocate and say this: My father was a social worker and often dealt with kids who were hyper-active. He strongly believed that sugar made a kid (probably one with ADD or ADHD) even worse. If the parents would take away the sugar, they would see improvement. The ones who tried it... noticed a DEFINITIVE difference. My ex-husband's kids both have ADHD and I noticed a DEFINITIVE difference with them when they ate more than just a small amount of sugar. So, I think it depends on the person. We are all different... and, for some, sugar might just make you bounce off the walls. And others... no.

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  56. Mmmmm, candy. Got any bottle caps?

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  57. We are so happy to be sharing your book on our blog this week!

    This is fascinating! I have always heard that sugar makes people hyper- even though it seemed off to me- it is nice to learn that it isn't true. It reminds me of the wrong advice about going out with wet hair and catching a cold. They don't go together, but people still say it!

    ~Jess

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  58. I try dont use so much sugar in my recipes! and someones I add Stevia or other when is a little nobody notice!
    I know many sugar is dangerous! My dad is diabetic but he never care himself and still he is angry when we say, no you cant eat that OMY!

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  59. I'm glad to know this isn't true. I notice that sugar doesn't make me hyper.

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  60. Maybe it's all in the mind. Whenever my nephew eats sugar he becomes INCREDIBLY hyper!!

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  61. One thing I am sure of is that sugar is addicting and I am hooked! Chocolate is my biggest downfall. I've quit caffeine and nicotine both, but I can't seem to quit sugar.

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