Friday, August 15, 2014

Body Problems You Never Knew You Had

I grew up in the 80s--the era of high-waisted pants and oversized shirts.



We felt pretty cool. The jeans we wore were pretty forgiving. Here's an example of jeans we would have worn in the mid-80s.



You could have a not-so-perfect body and disguise it with something like that. Flash forward to 2014. Clothes aren't forgiving at all.



You can clearly make out a person's flaws in jeans like that. Because of jeans like this, society has felt the need to come up with a term: "muffin top." Muffin top happens when your stomach hangs over your low-rise jeans like a muffin.




Since it's apparent low-rise jeans aren't a trend and are here to stay permanently, we'll have to get used to that term. Making matters worse, the super-tight skinny jeans trend is creating a new monster. Thigh gap. The most disgusting body image concern to ever cross a young girl's mind.



Next up are cankles. Seriously. Not only do we have to worry about the distance between our thighs and the way our stomachs look in low-rise jeans--but we now have to worry about our ankles being too fat. Our ankles.




I don't even know what exercises you'd do to work out your ankles.

There are more. There's the "thut," turnip legs, and age-old problems like double chins and saddlebags. Women worry excessively about this crazy stuff. Men don't. If you need proof that men don't care about "thigh gap," here it is:




Do you think this habit of ridiculing a person's imperfections will continue? Or is it just a trend?

62 comments:

  1. Sometimes, I wish the possibility if big thighs and ankles could be signs of beauty.

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  2. What's funny is it's an obsession spread by the media, and some people aim for it, but where I live, the amount of overweight people (especially teens) who don't even try scares me.
    We should be focused on a healthy body, not an anorexic unhealthy one. A healthy female body should have some meat and curves. Besides, it is sexier than a woman who is a toothpick.
    And fat ankles? Really? Something I would never even notice...

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  3. I can't think of a body part that was focused on in the 70s or 80s......you just needed big hair! I suppose there were people who couldn't achieve that.

    What amazes me are girls who can't pull off some of these clothing trends, but still insist on doing so. Where is their parent? It was especially bad during the belly showing years of Britney Spears.

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  4. The worst for that, Bijoux, is LEGGINGS. I go to the mall and feel like I'm going blind. Leggings are meant to be worn under something that covers your stomach and butt. YIKES!

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  5. Such a great topic today Stephanie.
    For me the worst eye sore is the bum crack...lol...

    Hugs,
    JB

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  6. thanks to American shows and music stars, the world has become slutty and superficial over the years... and it's getting worse.... I don't see the trend stopping until the society changes.

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  7. Seriously, as an old frump, I get tired of it.

    My life-time low BP shot through the roof all of a sudden, and my doc is juggling meds to try and treat it.

    All this TMI to say that I have one ankle that is swollen as a result; my friend thinks that should be my main concern: a "fat" ankle.

    Actually, if she was really paying attention, she'd note my fat everything...so, there's that...

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  8. Cherdo--Your friend SAYS that?

    The good news is, superficial people often have nothing going for them but their looks. Someday those will go and what will they have? They can start doing plastic surgery but eventually time catches up with them anyway and they just look sad. You have to accomplish more in life than looking good or someday you'll realize how little that means unless you're an actor/model.

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  9. I for one am happy hip huggers have come back because they are way more comfortable than high waisted jeans; they give my tummy room to breath :)

    And it IS the media. I remember reading something not too long ago in which men talk about women's bodies and how they really don't care anywhere near as much as we do. They want to get with us, if you know what I mean, they don't care if we have a little muffin top or imperfect ankles or anything other than a perfect perky 36B/C/D. Women - thanks in large part to the media - are the biggest critics of their own bodies.

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  10. I loved my clothes in the 80s! I think we accessorized more than anything and that certainly distracted from any imperfections. Today, fashion wants to enhance certain things, like tummy and hips and thighs (or lack thereof).

    Remember headbands, big hair, and wide belts? Yo-yo shoes, knickers, and chic jeans with the slit on the ankles? That's how we rolled.

    :)

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  11. Those jeans are not only unforgiving they are positively uncomfortable. I am so over jeans that sit on my hips give me the big ugly ones that cover my tummy any day! : )

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  12. Will people ever not bully which is what I call it...nope! It would be nice to think that people will evolve and not be so mean but that will not happen especially in the fashion industry who view young girls as cattle. What I find interesting and really wonder about is this: More clothes are made to be fit tightly, the material clings, the size can now go down to a double 00(what in blazes is that!??) and the image of a perfect woman is a stick-huge boobs with a 17 inch waist and small hips but an ass the size of Cleveland and very, very thin, then legs that must walk in 15 inch heels. If Marilyn Monroe was trying to be famous now they would tell her to lose 60lbs. Now with this image being hyped everywhere and sizes going smaller and smaller, the average women is bigger and bigger. There are more fried foods, instant crap to nuke and so much junk out there to eat that the average woman is much bigger than the average woman in the 1950's. Why? These same women wear tight jeans that don't look good on them with tight tops that also show every flab. We need to find go back a few decades where the women's body was healthier..period! less crap to eat but also more realistic image besides most men like some meat on women's bones. They love the curves not the anorexic look or the honey boo boo mother's look. No matter what health is lacking and everything tight doesn't help either. The fashion nuts seem to propel these unhealthy looks-what a shame

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  13. This is such a good point! I never realized how much easier it was in the 80's haha. Unfortunately, I think people's imperfections will be continued to be pointed out, and people - women especially - will probably never stop trying to reach unreachable standards.

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  14. lmao getting down to the ankles being fat is just plain ridiculous. Unfortunately though when there is a buck to be made and people follow such things like sheep, such so called imperfections will be pointed out. People just need to wise up, watch what they eat and get off the couch, screw the toothpick look

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  15. People are so busy worrying about their own insecurities that they don't care about ours! If a woman is confident, that's all that matters. She can have all the cankles and muffin tops in the world, but if she knows she's fly, then others will believe it and marvel at her level of confidence. I think that people focus on this type of stuff because of their own body issues and unrealistic beauty standards set by the mainstream media.

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  16. We are getting obsessed with getting that perfect figure even to the extent of going under the knife. Thigh gap, love handles, flat tummy, small waist are the latest worries that has hit women all over the world.

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  17. i think it will only get worse, frankly. sharing instantly on the internet and getting hate comments or likes, etc. only compounds the issues.

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  18. I actually never heard of that until now. I think it's really only women who over-obsess on it.

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  19. Great post however low-rise jeans were very popular in the sixties and they went away. Thigh gap was also a thing of the sixties -- they've both come back! Maybe eventually we can bring back the eighties!

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  20. It will continue. It has been going on since the beginning of time. There is that image of the perfect woman and that changes with time. Yes indeed.

    Have a fabulous day. ☺

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  21. Sadly, I don't think it's a trend. It's just society keeps aging and getting worse and creates new ways for you to hate yourself, basically. Pretty ridiculous. :( I pick comfort over fashion/trends anyway.

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  22. I don't mind low-rise or skinny jeans, and I have heard of the cankles problem, but thigh gap—really!? That's a thing? LOL What's next? I think it's important to be comfortable in your own skin, regardless of your shape or size, and just try to ignore what everyone else thinks. Health is more important than beauty IMO.

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  23. Ah yes, the shaming of the female. It's been going on for centuries in one form or another. Until we learn to tune out and accept ourselves for all our wonderfulness, this sort of thing will happen.

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  24. I think the fashion industry and other powers-that-be want young girls worrying about their body image till they pull their hair out, because they are messing with us. Oh, yes, and they want LOTS of money! I am so glad I don't have a little girl during this time. The 80s and 90s was hard enough, raising a girl, but it's ten times worse now!!!! I don't envy any parent these days! I like Liz's comment--the "shaming of the female." It's true.

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  25. Sigh. When I read about women having plastic surgery on their feet so that they could continue to wear (very) high heels I dispaired.
    Some of it is media, some of it is money making, all of it is sad and superficial.
    And I don't see it stopping any time soon.

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  26. Excuse me, while I step outside and shoot myself.

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  27. The conversation has become public but the effect is the same. Queenie and millions of others grew up knowing they were entirely inadequate simply due to some superficial flaws. Some, like our daughters, are able to rise above it (so far) but others like Queenie were not able to overcome it's crippling effects. Taking the conversation public has only made the problem worse. Thinks I.

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  28. I had not heard of muffin top; my husband just told me about thigh gap a few weeks ago; hadn't heard that one either up until them. Sadly, I don't have a thigh gap but do have a muffin top :) (and personally I'm okay with both)

    betty

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  29. I wish the whole ridiculous idea of a perfect body for a woman would go away. It's ridiculous. I don't think it's going away any time soon. I think it's probably going to get worse, it seems like it has got very bad over the last few years. I feel bad for kids growing up surrounding by all of it.

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  30. It would be nice if we could go back to the 80s style. I often think how lucky I am that I grew up then when our clothes left something to the imagination and were certainly more forgiving. So much to worry about now a days!

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  31. Sadly, I do, at least in this society. As plastic surgery has become more common, along with airbrushing, it's just gotten worse and worse. I wish men in general realized that women had value past their twenties, and that FF-size breasts don't normally go with a 20-inch waist.

    Sigh.

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  32. Holli, there's justice in the fact that most 20-somethings have one word to say when a middle-aged guy gawks at them. "EWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWW." Most men do see that value. The ones that don't aren't men you'd want to deal with anyway. Men who leer at teenagers are a special kind of skeevy!

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  33. Sadly I think that it is going stay this way :(

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  34. I've embraced the fact that I matured into a lower plus size, and that I'll probably never fit into an 8 or 10 again. Even when I could fit into those small sizes, it was a huge amount of effort to be that size. I regularly work out and wear flattering clothes meant for larger women, and due to how my body is built, I don't think most people would guess I'm a size 14-18. The weight is distributed flatteringly, and I don't look obviously overweight.

    I don't wear pants that often, partly because of modesty and partly because it's just hard to find flattering, well-fitting pants at my size and with my specific body shape.

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  35. I'm thankful that I'm old enough to know what matters. I feel bad for the teens though, that's too much pressure for them.

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  36. It's just crazy. I was a 90s kid and really don't remember obsessing like people do these days (lordy that makes me feel old). The thigh gap thing is just. *hangs head* It's ridiculous.

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  37. I hope the ridicule stops... we need to love and accept each other... as for the thigh gap, that isn't anything I aspire to...

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  38. I think this kind of thing has been around forever and will stay around - the rules just change with the "it" girl or the style guru or some social media trend. I am trying to raise a 12-year old girl in all this mess. She is a dancer/gymnast, so she has muscular legs and arms and in the studio she is showing them off, but at school, she worries that she looks different. She's shared with me that her classmates have been comparing their weight and "thigh gap" since 4th grade - it's ridiculous!

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  39. It's so crazy the pressure women feel to look 'acceptable'. I'm thirty, and I still feel it. Here lately though, I'm not so much worried about my thighs touching and my love handles b/c of what they look like, but b/c of how out of shape I feel. =( I definitely need to start exercising more.

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  40. Now, THAT'S what I call proof, alright.

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  41. I hope it does stop and soon. Nobody is perfect and everybody's body is different. I don't care about thighs touching, as long as you feel comfortable and like who you are, then the rest doesn't matter.

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  42. Hahaa...thanks for the giggle and so true as I battle an aging body!

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  43. Just have to change those checkout stand covers to the more voluptuous female form, I guess. Why we prize the skinny, malnourish I don't know. Yet, as your last pictures show, there's beauty in those full thighs.

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  44. My ankles did actually get noticeably slimmer after I started walking regularly :) My ankles/calves are now my favorite physical feature, lol.

    With my weight loss I do have the thigh gap thing going on now too, but I don't really understand the hype with that one? I never look at my thighs-probably because I'm too busy staring at my awesome ankles hehehe :D

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  45. Thigh gap. Ugh. What a ridiculous term, along with "thinspiration".

    I wonder why we can't just celebrate our bodies the way they are, imperfect and lovely?

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  46. I'm 44 years old and just don't let these types of things bother me anymore. I'm so past trying to follow all the new fabulous weirdo trends. I think people should just be happy with themselves.

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  47. Sigh. My ship has sailed on these concerns, but my girls are coming up in this age.

    That's it. I'm bringing back the 80's MC Hammer pants. It's the only solution.

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  48. I agree that this beauty ideal does not come from men. Women are just too hard on themselves and each other.

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  49. Okay, one more comment. Lol. This is why I try very hard to not say negative things about myself in front of my daughters. I don't want to pass on that nit picky, negative thing we do when we look in the mirror. (I still do it, I'm afraid, but I try to keep it to myself.)

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  50. We are, Rachel! I think that's the best thing to do--set a good example for the young women in your lives and teach them that your worth isn't based on something silly like whether your thighs touch or not. (Which is crazy anyway, since every person's build is different.)

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  51. Consider corsets, padded bras, girdles and push up bras. These ideas of how to make a body part more beautiful in the eyes of what's currently acceptable seem to never end. Ugh but that muffin top. Those low-rise jeans are just badly designed! (Doesn't help though to have a bit of a tummy). Nice post Stephanie.

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  52. We are way to obsessed with a perfect figure. Why I don't know. My hubby says he'd prefer me being 'chunky' to being too thin and anorexic. Me too.

    We called it the BEER belly instead of a muffin top. Or blamed it on the kids we bore. lol

    When I worked in the school district, the thing that was part of the 'trendy look' was low rise jeans on boys AND girls.

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  53. I think everything is always changing but some things like people caring about how they are won't...

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  54. I'd rather have a muffin top than a camel toe. One of my friend's says that she's built like a lollipop--round around the middle with stick legs. She looks great in tight pants or leggings, as long as she covers up her midriff area. Sadly, as long as I have hair, I'll always look like I'm stuck in the 80's!

    Julie

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  55. oh, the thigh gap! I hate that this is a thing...I don't think it's ever going to end, sadly. I wish it would though. That colbert meme is hilarious though.

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  56. Sadly yes, I do believe too many people will continue to be judgmental with others.

    I did laugh at your 80s jeans though. It flashed me back to a pair that I used to have and love--they were between jeans and sweat pants and I wore them way too much.

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  57. It will continue. It will always be something. People have a strange obsession with looking whatever way the current trend happens to be for their area.
    I blame the movie 300 for the new standard of 8 pack abs (6 isn't enough) that men are required to bare in order to be hot now. Oh, and that hip bone V thing.

    Though perhaps social media will separate us enough from each other that, one day, we'll be forced to judge people on their minds and personalities first. Maybe next century. ;)

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  58. Hadn't heard of the thigh gap. Living under a rock has it's benefits.

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  59. Ah, I have a picture of me and my brother in Hammer pants. We had our hands in our pockets and pulled the pants taut out to our sides. Mine had the elastic stirrups. Oh yeah. I was rockin' it.

    I like the way jeans ride on my hips instead of at my waist. Makes me feel less fat, because I can actually zip them up and button them. When they're at my waist, I can't get them around the flub without exhaling all the air in my system first.

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  60. Hi Stephanie .. my gosh I hadn't heard of thigh gap - and how dreadful .. sadly I suspect we'll carry on being critical of women - ridiculous .. but there you go ...

    I am appalled at dropping trousers - I really want to yank them off! Let alone bum cracks ...

    I think I'll just keep wearing my purple hat ... cheers Hilary

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  61. I think it's more about teenagers being teenagers. Yeah, low-rise jeans make it harder to hide any extra weight you're carrying in your midsection, and that sucks, but it's also easily combated with tunic style shirts (kind of like high-waisted pants), but things like thigh gaps are just silly. And really--who even notices someone's ankles? What is this, the Renaissance?

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  62. I'm surprised that the thigh thing is still around. I recall it from my youth and I'm now 60. I suppose all this body stuff has been going on since that painting of Venus on a shell was put up in public.
    The View from the Top of the Ladder

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