Wednesday, July 02, 2014

Authors, Don’t Blast Your Co-Workers

I once found myself engaged in a slightly heated conversation about book reviews. Someone made a comment that published authors should never trash other authors on social media.




That started a conversation about author responsibility. Once you're published, we decided, you become a community of co-workers of sorts. Just as a business owner shouldn't publicly blast a fellow business owner online, one author shouldn't trash another on Facebook or Twitter. 



That was when another published author stepped in. She writes for a small press while also regularly writing honest book reviews. She believes there's nothing wrong with speaking out if you don't like a book. After all, writers appreciate honesty.



It is a tough situation. Writers are avid readers. We also often know why a book isn't quite up to par. Yes, it's opinion but it's an informed opinion. We know the mechanics of crafting a good novel and can warn readers in advance. Yet if I post a negative review of a fellow author's book, she's going to see it. She may even be hurt by it. She may even hold that against me if, say, someday she has an opportunity to recommend my book or sign with me at a writer's conference. The writing world is a small place, after all...that scathing review you wrote of Hunger Games could hurt you five years from now, when you and Suzanne Collins are sharing space at the top of the NYT bestseller list. You never know...



What do you think? Should authors turn in their "reviewer" badges once published?

86 comments:

  1. They don't have to turn them in, but I think they have to approach reviews in a different manner. Yes, I know authors who still trash others' books, but as you said, it can come back to get you.
    One thing that has always baffled me about bad reviews - if I don't like a book that much, I stop reading it. (And if I don;t read it, I don't review it.) If it's awful, I don't plow through to the end just to finish. Life is too short.
    You should join the IWSG - this would've been a perfect post for it.

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  2. I am not an author, but I do agree that writers are a family and should try to have some semblance of solidarity, for it's one of the toughest jobs on earth!

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  3. There are so many books and so many categories of books all written by authors, surely not everyone will agree with everything they read but I think that a mutual respect for each other's work would be a good thing.

    Everyone who reads a particular book will have different opinions as everyone bring their own life experiences into play when they read or review a book.

    Each review is seen from a different angle so to speak. When you put them all together, then you have an idea how good the book is...in my humble opinion.

    Keith said that being a writer is the toughest job on earth, I thought that being a mother was the toughest job on earth. lol...
    Hugs,
    JB

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  4. I'd trash everything that I strongly believe needs to be trashed... and that would be pure trash of course :) I'd also trash everything that is dangerous, irresponsible and immoral... which means most of today's books LOL
    But if me was a writer I probably wouldn't want an image of somebody who criticises - I'd rather be a spreader of goodness LOL

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  5. I agree with Alex--if I don't like a book, I stop reading it. Even if I just paid $7 to download it on Kindle. I figure it's someone's thing, even if it's not mine. I really don't think there's a book out there that wouldn't appeal to someone and my tastes are so specific, 99 percent of the time I just say, "This just isn't my type of book." I can't imagine ever thinking it's bad enough to publicly ridicule it unless it's just such a sloppy mess that anyone who read it would see it shouldn't have been published! It's been a long time since I've seen a book that bad.

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  6. I REALLY think reviewing anything reflects on a person's character. Are you a considerate person in real life? If so you'll probably be considerate with a review. If you're highly critical in real life you may be online as well.

    I too do NOT ditz a book or the author if I don't like the book. It is SOOOO much work to write a book. However, I may contact the author privately (I did in the past),but I would stop reading and not review.


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  7. Like my mother always said, "If you can't say something nice, don't say anything at all." Just because I don't like a book doesn't mean the rest of the world won't like it. If I'm asked to critique a manuscript by an author--and I was once asked to do just that by a beginning author who is now a NY Times best seller many times over--I'll offer constructive suggestions from a reader's point of view. I may be a writer, but I am not the world's authority on other writer's work. If I like a published book, I'll comment on why I like it. If I don't like it I don't finish it, so there is really nothing for me to say that will be relevant. Someone likes it or it wouldn't be on the shelves.

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  8. I am not a writer but I think each person would give a different review of the same book. So let them review!

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  9. If we are talking about a published review, I would hope an author would not be writing negative reviews of a book in his or her own genre. That would be like a food critic that owns a Thai restaurant criticizing the Thai restaurant across town.

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  10. Constructive criticism I see nothing wrong with, but just trashing a book, yeah that can come back to bite you in the arse. That is why many chicken umm poops make a fake profile and then trash the book.

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  11. Reviewing is just another facet of life in general. There should be a REVIEWER'S GOLDEN RULE: "Review unto others as you would have them review you."

    If the point of the review is a true assessment of the work, then be truthful - not hurtful. Hurtful never fixes or improves anything.

    Thought provoking post, Ms. Stephanie!

    Cherdo
    www.cherdoontheflipside.com

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  12. I think anyone reviewing a book should show a respect for the work that goes into writing one, whether the reviewer liked the book or not. Surely, it still took work. As for should 'published' authors stop reviewing once published? I think that's a strange notion. After all, they are still humans--not better or worse. And how would one decide about a self-published author's reviewing rights? After all, some self published authors know no more than someone who's only had short stories published, if even that, while other self-published authors are fantastic and just as good and knowledgeable as traditionally published authors. So, I'm not sure about the 'published' aspect of it, but I do think from writer to writer, we should be respectful of the work each other does. And, if a book isn't good, chances are the reader will quit before the end and then not review it because he or she can't give an honest summary, evaluation, or opinion. That's my opinion anyway. :-)

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  13. i can imagine that it gets dicey. however, if it is constructive criticism given - in any situation - it should be honestly given and with a soft touch. scathing reviews don't do anyone any good.

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  14. I can't imagine well known writers would even contemplate writing a review of another author's book. I'm a reader first, so I might write a review if I absolutely loved something, but if I were to become published and read a book that I didn't like, I'd pass on writing a review.

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  15. Ohhh, now this is a tough one! I don't think they should stop writing reviews just because they're published. I know some that still do, but as long as it's constructive criticism. If you don't go into too much detail and highlight the positives before the negatives and it's honest, I don't see the problem. I know how it can cause problems, but still.

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  16. This is an interesting topic. Since I doubt I will ever be a published writer (and I don't consider myself a writer), I'm not sure how to answer it, but I do think reviews in general can be subjective. I may like something because it appeals to me and write a good review about it, but if something isn't what I would be interested in, I'm not sure I could objectively look at the writing style and then comment about it in a review. Make sense?

    betty

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  17. It seems everyone is trashing everyone anymore. If you don't think like they do then you're trashed. I'm not an author, but if someone is trashing another author I will not read the trashing author. I'm sick of all the trash talk and avoid those people. My money avoids them too.

    Have a fabulous day. ☺

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  18. I'm very considerate and try to review in a fair way. I admit to staying away from reviewing the books that are just not working. Depending on the author, I might contact them privately about typos and such. But more than likely not. I figured if they publish it as is, they probably don't care anyway.

    Story lines, well, its all opinion and its based on personal likes and dislikes, so I guess I don't pick on it. I do worry about it coming back to bite me as you said so that is a factor.

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  19. I actually kicked my reviewing into high gear after being published--because I realized how vital it is to an author. I was also more harsh before being published. You don't realize what a huge deal it is to see a 1 star review until you've got a book on the market. You can be honest about a book without destroying the author's self esteem. That's my opinion.

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  20. Very interesting discussion. I agree with Alex, I think published authors and even writers do need to be careful about what is said concerning another person's work. If the book is really that bad, then don't finish it and don't review it. Bad reviews hurt authors, so even if I didn't like a book, I would never rag on it. My tastes could differ from someone else's, and as far as judging the quality of writing, well, we are all improving.

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  21. I've never left a bad review - now or before I started writing. Mostly because I'm like Alex, when I hate a book I don't finish it so I don't write a review. Also, I just feel uncomfortable about writing bad reviews. I guess I have always followed the idea that "if you can't say something nice don't say anything at all."

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  22. I don't write negative reviews. This has nothing to do with hurting someone's feelings. It's because I'm trying to get published.

    Suppose an agent or editor has time to take on one more client and has three manuscripts that show promise. Author A has a nice blog and only says supportive things. Author B has no online presence. Author C sometimes writes nasty things about other writers. Which would you choose?

    In vain do people say, "I'm not nasty, I'm honest." But these people skim blogs quickly to get impressions. And those impressions are hard to reverse.

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  23. Good post. This post is the reason why I don't like writing reviews (even though I am not published yet). I am a very fussy reader and most times I don't always like what I read. If I can't say something nice about someone's book I refuse to review it. I don't want to hurt anyone's feelings or seem unprofessional. I know if someone wrote a bad review of my book and posted it online I would go to pieces.

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  24. I don't like leaving bad reviews, simply because I'm a bit of a wimp, but I don't like hurting people's feelings. I post reviews of both books and movies, and I think I feel freer when posting movie reviews than when writing book reviews, because I'm well aware of the effect of bad reviews. I don't tend to write book reviews if I think the book's worth less than 3 stars. But I can be scathing of a movie if I think it was awful.

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  25. No way! I review books and while I have never had to give someone close to me a scathing review. I have pointed out pitfalls where they come up and every author who has responded has pretty much taken my reviews well. You have to decide what matters more, your true feelings/thoughts or bridges. I saw bridges collapse all the time.

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  26. Oh, this is such a quandary. I've only been asked to review a handful of books, and honestly, I loved all of them. I know, however, there will be books in the future I won't like, and I'm not entirely sure how to handle that. This only applies to books given to me for a review. If I buy a book at the bookstore or order one off of amazon, and I hate it within the first five chapters, I simply stop reading. No review needed.

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  27. Well-said; you made good points. While book reviews ARE subjective, we definitely have to be careful not to trash another author's book. I've changed my attitude toward writing reviews--trying to stay honest yet positive with my comments. Even while I'm pre-published.

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  28. I am with you-I have not heard, in movie land, a director berate another director's work that is what film critics are all about. One should be a book critic and that is all. I think there is such a thing called constructive criticism. This should not on a page where all can see either but a person could e-mail and explain their issues with plot, sentences or grammar. I don't know but when I think of film which I know alot more about and i just watch films, they are careful not to say anything because they must work and see these people often

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  29. I've very non-confrontational offline, so that tends to reflect online as well. Honestly, reviews are hit and miss for me. I'm so busy, that sometimes, I just ran out of time and forgot to post a review. But if the book is horrible, the I won't review it. I probably won't even finish it. :)

    Loni

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  30. I think it's important to have people who will honestly review books and being an author shouldn't stop someone from posting their review. However...I also think it's important to be mindful of our words.

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  31. As a reviewer, I feel like I'm balancing a huge tower of China in both hands and on my head while trying to duck through a doorway. I think one can point out what they didn't care for but can't forget to point out what was good. And if the book is that bad, why read it in the first place? There's too many good ones out there to waste time with the bad ones.

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  32. Oh, my! As a reviewer I would say be honest. But I think the other side of the coin is when a published author reviews and gives a bad review to another author's book. It may come back to bite her!

    So be honest but don't trash someone's hard work.

    Nas

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  33. Hi Stephanie,

    As a mere blogger, rather than a published author, I am in no position to comment on the etiquette of offering a brutally honest opinion about a fellow authors work.

    However, as a blogger there is to some extent, always the same dilemma to overcome. If an author asks you to review their book, do you provide a totally honest review if the book is so bad that it is difficult to find anything positive to say, or do you hedge your bets and take the diplomatic middle ground? Luckily I can't think of a book I have read which has been so bad that I couldn't find anything good to say about it!

    To my mind, reviews are always very subjective, as they are so much a matter of personal opinion, which is going to vary from reader to reader .... 'One man's meat..' and all that!

    I usually try to highlight the positive points about the writing and storyline, whilst not dwelling too much on the weaker aspects of the book.

    The only things I do find difficulty in tolerating are, bad grammar, poor spelling, loose editing and sloppy proof reading.

    If, as an author, you are expecting an unpaid blogger to take time to review your book, at least make sure that it is in top notch condition first, whether it has been professionally published, or you have gone down the self-publishing route.

    If you are expecting a potential reader to pay good money for your work, then this is even more imperative.

    An interesting question and post, I had fun reading the many varied comments and opinions and it was good to see that we don't all agree about things.

    Yvonne

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  34. I think this is a tough question....if I were the writer I'd want the truth... it might hurt but I prefer honesty.

    As much as I want it, I know most people wouldn't want it...

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  35. I've actually been asking myself this question. I know that I've posted a couple of meh reviews with less than three star ratings on Goodreads. But the closer I get to publication, the more I wonder whether that's wise. Hum...

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  36. I wondered the same thing Kim. 10 years ago if I read a bestseller I didn't like, I would feel it was my duty to warn others about it before they wasted their $$$. Same with any item I bought on Amazon or another site. However, now I see it as a networking nightmare. I also have come to realize, as I get older, that opinions and tastes are very different. I think when you're younger you think everyone should think like you do and as you get older (hopefully), you grow and mature and learn that you aren't the know-it-all you once thought you were!

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  37. Writer feuds have gone back centuries. I remember reading something Mark Twain once wrote about those fellow authors he did not respect. Of course, with social media, these feuds are now on steroids.

    I guess it depends on what kind of person you are. Some people need to tell everyone what they think. Others need to be kind. Whatever works, I suppose.

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  38. I tend to either not say anything if I feel a book is that bad or I will do the sandwich principle. Something good, something bad, followed by something good. And, yes, it can come back to bite you if you're mean spirited. :)

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  39. Hey Stephanie,

    I think that continuing to review others work once published, if anything, should form a part of interaction inspiration. Take the rough with the smooth and we know, it's ongoing learning process.

    Gary

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  40. Gosh great questions...as a reader, not a fellow writer, I'd be disheartened to find a less than honest review. But I can see that you might not want to "trash" someones work...I'd have a hard time doing that even if their work was awful.

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  41. I try to review most of the books I read and do so honestly. I'm never harsh in my reviews (I've learned a lot over the past couple of years) and I always emphasize the positives and downgrade the negatives.

    I sincerely believe that most writers want to know what they can do to improve their craft and how the readers feel about their work.

    Have a great night. Lily Eva

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  42. I'm all in favor of honest reviews but I also think if you want to be taken seriously as an author you need to approach your writing career the way you would any other career. That means behaving like a professional. Ugly reviews leave an ugly impression. Writers, of all people, should know how to convey a thought with grace and style. After all, that's our job.

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  43. I don't think I've ever left a negative review that I can think of. If I don't like something I don't review it. I'm always afraid to hurt ppl's feelings, so yup. =)

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  44. I really thing authors should be able to still write honest reviews, but I do believe they have to be more politically correct about it as to not alienate themselves in the writing world.

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  45. I’m a bookseller not an author but would never rubbish another bookseller, so I think the same should be the case among authors.
    As my mum used to say, "If you can't say something nice, don't say anything at all." Alternatively, if you really want to let other's know you didn’t like it just say something like – this one wasn’t for me and then go on to pick out a couple of good things about the story.

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  46. I'm not an author so I can't say for that part but I think that everybody should be able to express his/her feelings about a book without any problems. I know a French author who says mean things on facebook about some books and is hurt when other are saying things about her work. But I think it's ok she says she doesn't like a book, only just not by being mean.

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  47. You are correct. That is a tough call. While I agree that everyone is entitled to their opinions, and no one should ever be hesitant about speaking up about that opinion, for me personally . . . it would come down to professional courtesy.

    If I was an author, I think I'd refrain from negatively reviewing another author's work. If specifically asked about a book I didn't like, I'd say that the author is talented, but that particular book didn't work for me. The end. Otherwise . . . what's the difference between criticizing a book and break room gossip? SAME TEAM.

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  48. Such a hard question, but if you choose to write reviews, you need to give an honest and fair review. After all if you rave about a book that I felt had major plot issues and was tell not show it might change the way a reader views your new release. I would be hesitant to read a new to me author who raved about a poorly written book.

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  49. Generally, I will not review a book if I think it's terrible. Sometimes, though, when I receive a review request, it's expected that I review the book. I try not to give anything below a "3" on Amazon. When I give reviews, though, I still try to point out positive aspects of the book so it's not all negative.

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  50. Honesty is good but sometimes too much honesty is... damaging. It's how to strike a balance between the two.

    Great post.

    Greetings from London.

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  51. A great thought-provoking post!

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  52. Tough question. I don't generally review many books. If I really like it, I'll try to support the author and post an honest, positive review. If I don't like it, I actually get a boost from it. If this bad book was published, then there's hope for me! lol!

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  53. Good topic! On one hand, authors are a part of a very small community and need to support each other (and get along!), but on the other hand, they're still readers who have valid opinions about books. Hmmmm-that's a tough one!

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  54. Hi beautiful,
    I was just browsing through & stumbled upon your lovely blog - It looks gorgeous and it has interesting posts that I can relate to, I’ll come back for sure.
    Would you like to follow each other on GFC and other social media?
    Let me know and let’s keep in touch love <3
    http://xoxocitygirl.blogspot.pt/

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  55. I think it's good advice never to trash anyone, because it's always better to be respectful. That being said, if something is not working I will say so in my reviews, but I will also look for good things to highlight, because usually there is. Have a lovely 4th of July.

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  56. If I am completely honest, I really don't like when an author trashes a book. It turns me off that author and makes me not want to read their own books. But, it's hard because we all have different opinions and it's silly to tell someone they can't have an opinion on a book now that they're published. But... why do they need to post it to social media? I don't know, personally I don't like it. I prefer authors who don't post reviews of books, unless it's a book they really loved and want to recommend.

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  57. I think authors walk a very thin line, and that in most cases it's usually better to err on the side of caution. I'm not a writer, but if I was I think I would turn in my reviewer badge just in case. There aren't too many professions out there where you open yourself up to being publicly criticized, so I have nothing but the utmost respect for the work they do.

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  58. Great question Stephanie and one without an easy answer. If I read a friend's book and hated it, it would be difficult to be completely honest and trash them in a review. When it has happened before, I chose to just not post a review.

    My general policy on book reviews is that I won't take any free books. I only purchase books (even from friends) so that I don't feel obligated to offer only positive comments.

    Oh, and the bookmarks arrived. Well done! The gang and I will place them in creative place. One place I can think of is in found geocaches if you are familiar with those.

    Happy 4th!

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  59. I think author and readers should always use polite and fair sentences when ommenting a book, especially if they don't like it.
    NICE POST!

    xoxo
    www.bellezzefelici.blogspot.com

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  60. I think author and readers should always use polite and fair sentences when ommenting a book, especially if they don't like it.
    NICE POST!

    xoxo
    www.bellezzefelici.blogspot.com

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  61. My dad always said, "If you can't say anything nice, don't say anything at all." We're so Canadians, eh? If I don't enjoy a book, I won't review it. If there is something constructive I can say or suggest in a positive way, I will say it. Having spent a lot of my adult life in the company of young and vulnerable writers, I carefully consider what I say in a comment or a review.

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  62. Really interesting post! I think generally reviews should be limited to professional reviewers...except for saying what a book is about and whether or not you found it worth the read. Beyond that, it gets a little personal. :-) I do a short book review on my sidebar of the books I read. But I don't post the books I read and thought weren't worth my time. I just leave those off the list! :-) I have one right now I could have placed on my sidebar and reviewed, but chose not to waste my time on it. I am not, after all, a professional and whose to say they won't write a scathing review of MY book. Nope, leave that to those with thicker skin! :-)

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  63. I think honesty is important. When you write something for the public view you need to expect negative feedback. There is no way you can please everyone. If the review is written in a respectful way the author can use it to learn from it. I do not see anything wrong with that. However, being down right mean is unneccesary and should be avoided.

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  64. I see no reason for an author to turn their reviewer badges in. I do however believe that there's a nice way of writing a review for a book that you didn't really like and a bad way. There's no need to bash the author but if you didn't like the book you can as a reviewer say what it was about the book that you didn't like. Everyone is going to have a different opinion about the books they read. Not everyone is going to love all the books they read but it's ok to leave a truthful review.

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  65. This is something I'm so so so unsure about!!! SHOULD THEY?? I plan to be a published author some day, but book reviewing is my favourite thing. Of course I could review under another name, but I find that mildly pointless. I want to be ME. But yes...I do get why it feels betrayal for authors to criticise each other. Even if that isn't exactly logical. :|
    Thanks for stopping by @ Notebook Sisters!

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  66. I think it depends what style of review it is and who it's written for. I do enjoy it when authors I know and like write reviews for things like the New York Times book section or the London Review of Books...

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  67. Oh, this is a tough one! I struggle with the answer to this! Usually, I stick with what my mama taught me: if I don't have anything nice to say, I don't say anything at all!

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  68. You have said it correctly that authors are avid readers and as a reader I deserve my time's worth that I am investing. Reading for me is a very passionate affair. If I dont find my time's worth I feel hurt. Though I havent reviewed many books and I have been recently published, I feel that as authors our responsibility to work towards betterment of what is being written. And if that means saying negative things about a book that you havent liked, then one shouldnt shy away from doing that. After all, it is only going to improve the author if taken in the right spirit.

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  69. This is something I'm SO unsure about, and it seems like there are a lot of people who feel unsure about it as well. One one hand, I totally get what you mean about not criticizing your "coworkers" and I think that's a great message. I mean, we're all in this together, right?

    On the other hand, I think it's inevitable that you're going to dislike a book at one point or another if you're an avid reader, and if you do so respectfully, that shouldn't be a problem, right?

    Thanks for bringing this up though Stephanie! Definitely one of the most thought-provoking discussion questions I've read in a long time! :)

    ~ Zoe @ The Infinite To-Read Shelf

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  70. great postm, congrats i'm agree with u!
    have a nice week end!
    www.mrsnoone.it
    kiss

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  71. I can see the dilemma... On one hand I think honesty is important, especially if a book is really really bad, but on the other hand writing a negative review can have consequences for you in the future, so is it really worth it?

    http://bellapummarola.blogspot.it/

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  72. I believe in being honest but respectful. If a book isn't for me, I'll say that, but I'll also say who might enjoy the book. I'd never slam an author. If I really dislike a book, I just won't review it.

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  73. I'd say that it depends if the author enjoys engaging in avid debate and defending his or her own opinion.

    I wonder- how many famous food critics were once great chefs? There are several food shows where basically unknown people cook for some celebrity judge(s) in the hope of getting a critique.
    Then again...
    Some of those judges like things that I would never eat. A certain famous chef seems to only like food if it leaves his mouth bathed in lava and his stomach filled with demon fire. Any time he's given a food without spice, he seems to fail it. "This cupcake tastes too much like chocolate. Perhaps if it had some ghost chili peppers, six tablespoons of salt, and some duck liver... yeah, that might make it edible."

    So, if two authors share the same opinion on a great many books, and one of those authors dislikes the book of the other, that is probably going to carry some serious weight.

    But if the review comes from someone, fellow published author or not, who hates all that you love and loves all that you hate, is it really worth caring at all what they think? Sure, people who agree with that author will probably all side with him/her- but maybe they also share those likes.

    We learn and grow from reviews we take seriously.
    Anyone who enjoys reviewing honestly... there's always #writeclub2014 :)

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  74. I think there's a definite skill to reviewing! But I think if I was ever in a position to review a friend's published book I'd do so perhaps in private or not at all cos I'm a wimp and I don't have the skills! Take care
    x

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  75. There is always such a fine line with everything lately isn't there?
    But, I agree, there is never anything wrong with expressing how you feel about something as long as it is done respectfully to all concerned. I don't think bashing something should ever be allowed, it is just uncalled for.

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  76. I've read blurbs on the back of book covers and a lot are written by authors....but if you want my opinion...YOU are entitled to YOUR opinion of the book. And if someone asks, BE HONEST. Like or Dislike.

    I a co-worker in any work form is doing something under-par, they should know by the OTHER co-workers...I think it's a favor.

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  77. If I can't find something good to say about a book
    . . .meaning I read it start to finish. . .I won't review it. This was my plan before I started writing fiction myself and I haven't changed my mind.

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  78. My uninformed opinion is to say yes... but I have no credibility since I am not an author.

    Thanks for dropping by my blog and leaving a comment. It is nice to hear from you. Have a great week.

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  79. I'm so fed up with the thumb up or thumb down world we live in. You don't like a book, well, you just trash the book, as in literally. Don't trash the writer. It's a waste of energy.

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  80. Great thought provoking post, and love the comments.

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  81. I'd say tact is an appropriate consideration for any review, no matter the source. Little ol' me, I'm not even a published author and yet I've twice been contacted by living people about whom I'd written. One was an author. The other was Roberto Alomar, a Hall of Fame baseball player! Fortunately, I said nice things about both but it was a good lesson - you never know who's reading.

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  82. Same with me, Armchair! Only in my case it was Deborah Foreman from Valley Girl and that guy who played Chainsaw in Summer School. Of course, I sent a link to the article in both cases...but getting a response made me realize that if you write about a celebrity (especially one that is no longer a big star), chances are they're going to read it. Celebs Google themselves...probably more than the rest of us do!

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  83. Yep, I think you kind of have to. Even when you don't have to worry about backlash, it just looks tacky, like when Stephen King bashed Stephenie Meyer. I lost a little respect for him that day.

    People love the buzz created by feuds and negativity, and they'll remember stuff like that. Look at Rihanna and all the ridiculous feuds she starts with other singers. I don't think any writer wants a reputation like that.

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  84. I tend to only write reviews of books I like. If I read a book I don't like- I just don't review it. I know many people do review books they don't like and those reviews can be helpful. I prefer to write reviews to let others know about books I think they might want to read. So, that being said- I think it might be best for published authors to stick to positive reviews and to skip reviewing books they don't like. Some people might read a negative review from a published author and think it is because they are jealous...

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